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Influence of injection protocol and measurement technique on computed tomographic assessment of glomerular filtration rate in healthy Beagles

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  • 1 Clinic of Diagnostic Imaging, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich, 8057 Zurich, Switzerland.
  • | 2 Clinic of Diagnostic Imaging, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich, 8057 Zurich, Switzerland.
  • | 3 Clinic of Small Animal Internal Medicine, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich, 8057 Zurich, Switzerland.
  • | 4 Clinic of Small Animal Internal Medicine, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich, 8057 Zurich, Switzerland.
  • | 5 Section of Anesthesiology, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich, 8057 Zurich, Switzerland.
  • | 6 Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences ETH Zurich, Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 4, 8093 Zurich, Switzerland.
  • | 7 Sprachwerk GmbH, Technoparkstrasse 1, 8005 Zurich, Switzerland.
  • | 8 Clinic of Diagnostic Imaging, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich, 8057 Zurich, Switzerland.
  • | 9 Clinic of Diagnostic Imaging, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zurich, 8057 Zurich, Switzerland.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To compare values of CT-derived glomerular filtration rate (GFR) determined by 3 contrast-medium injection protocols and 4 measurement techniques in healthy Beagles.

ANIMALS 9 healthy Beagles (mean ± SD weight, 13.2 ± 1.6 kg).

PROCEDURES Each dog underwent 3 iohexol-injection protocols (700 mg of iodine/kg administered at a constant rate over 20 seconds, 700 mg of iodine/kg administered following an exponentially decelerated injection over 20 seconds, and 350 mg of iodine/kg at a constant rate over 10 seconds) during dynamic, whole renal-volume CT in randomized order with an interval of ≥ 7 days between experiments. Values of GFR determined from Patlak plots derived by use of 4 measurement techniques (standard transverse section, optimized transverse section, dorsal reconstruction, and volume calculation techniques) were compared.

RESULTS The measurement technique influenced the mean ± SD GFR results (standard transverse section technique, 2.49 ± 0.54 mL/kg/min; optimized transverse section technique, 2.72 ± 0.52 mL/kg/min; dorsal reconstruction technique, 3.00 ± 0.60 mL/kg/min, and volume calculation technique, 2.48 ± 0.51 mL/kg/min). The lower iodine dose resulted in a significantly higher GFR value (3.00 ± 0.65 mL/kg/min), compared with that achieved with either higher dose administration (constant rate injection, 2.54 ± 0.45 mL/kg/min and exponentially decelerated injection, 2.47 ± 0.48 mL/kg/min).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In healthy Beagles, the CT-derived GFR measurements obtained after injection of a full dose of contrast medium were reduced, compared with measurements obtained after injection of a half dose. This finding is important with regard to potential nephrotoxicosis in dogs with impaired renal function and for GFR measurement with CT-contrast medium protocols.

Contributor Notes

Mr. Wallimann's present address is Gross-und Kleintierpraxis, Hofstrasse 8, 6374 Buochs, Switzerland.

Mr. Santner's present address is IngCH – Engineers Shape our Future, Klosbachstrasse 107, 8032 Zurich, Switzerland. (Krämer).

Address correspondence to Dr. Dennler (mdennler@vetclinics.uzh.ch).