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Effect of a constant rate infusion of remifentanil hydrochloride on left ventricular systolic and diastolic function in propofol-anesthetized dogs

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  • 1 Department of Animal Clinic, Surgery, and Reproduction, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, São Paulo State University, Araçatuba, 16050-680, Brazil.
  • | 2 Department of Animal Clinic, Surgery, and Reproduction, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, São Paulo State University, Araçatuba, 16050-680, Brazil.
  • | 3 Department of Animal Clinic, Surgery, and Reproduction, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, São Paulo State University, Araçatuba, 16050-680, Brazil.
  • | 4 Department of Animal Clinic, Surgery, and Reproduction, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, São Paulo State University, Araçatuba, 16050-680, Brazil.
  • | 5 Department of Animal Clinic, Surgery, and Reproduction, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, São Paulo State University, Araçatuba, 16050-680, Brazil.
  • | 6 Department of Animal Clinic, Surgery, and Reproduction, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, São Paulo State University, Araçatuba, 16050-680, Brazil.
  • | 7 Department of Animal Clinic, Surgery, and Reproduction, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, São Paulo State University, Araçatuba, 16050-680, Brazil.
  • | 8 Department of Animal Clinic, Surgery, and Reproduction, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, São Paulo State University, Araçatuba, 16050-680, Brazil.
  • | 9 Department of Animal Clinic, Surgery, and Reproduction, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, São Paulo State University, Araçatuba, 16050-680, Brazil.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To assess the effects of a constant rate infusion (CRI) of remifentanil hydrochloride on left ventricular systolic and diastolic function in healthy propofol-anesthetized dogs.

ANIMALS 6 healthy Beagles.

PROCEDURES Each dog underwent 2 experimental treatments separated by a 7-day interval. In 1 treatment, anesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with a CRI of propofol (0.6 mg/kg/min); dogs also received a CRI of saline (0.9% NaCl) solution. In the other treatment, anesthesia was similarly induced and maintained with propofol; dogs also received a CRI of remifentanil (0.3 μg/kg/min). Doppler echocardiographic and hemodynamic variables of interest were determined at baseline (before anesthesia) and at 20, 40, and 60 minutes following the simultaneous start of the 2 CRIs of each treatment; all CRIs were administrated for 60 minutes.

RESULTS For the 2 treatments, end-diastolic and end-systolic volume indices did not differ from baseline or at any time point. Peak tissue Doppler-derived mitral annulus systolic velocity decreased from baseline with both treatments; however, no differences were found between treatments at any time point. Mean arterial blood pressure decreased similarly with both treatments. Heart rate and Doppler-determined cardiac index decreased significantly with the propofol-remifentanil treatment, compared with findings for the propofol-saline solution treatment. For the propofol-remifentanil treatment, the ratio of peak velocity flow in early diastole to that in late diastole remained > 1.80, whereas the ratio of early to late Doppler-derived mitral annulus velocity had a normal relaxation pattern.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results of this study indicated that a CRI of remifentanil administered along with a CRI of propofol does not impair left ventricular systolic and diastolic function in healthy dogs.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To assess the effects of a constant rate infusion (CRI) of remifentanil hydrochloride on left ventricular systolic and diastolic function in healthy propofol-anesthetized dogs.

ANIMALS 6 healthy Beagles.

PROCEDURES Each dog underwent 2 experimental treatments separated by a 7-day interval. In 1 treatment, anesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with a CRI of propofol (0.6 mg/kg/min); dogs also received a CRI of saline (0.9% NaCl) solution. In the other treatment, anesthesia was similarly induced and maintained with propofol; dogs also received a CRI of remifentanil (0.3 μg/kg/min). Doppler echocardiographic and hemodynamic variables of interest were determined at baseline (before anesthesia) and at 20, 40, and 60 minutes following the simultaneous start of the 2 CRIs of each treatment; all CRIs were administrated for 60 minutes.

RESULTS For the 2 treatments, end-diastolic and end-systolic volume indices did not differ from baseline or at any time point. Peak tissue Doppler-derived mitral annulus systolic velocity decreased from baseline with both treatments; however, no differences were found between treatments at any time point. Mean arterial blood pressure decreased similarly with both treatments. Heart rate and Doppler-determined cardiac index decreased significantly with the propofol-remifentanil treatment, compared with findings for the propofol-saline solution treatment. For the propofol-remifentanil treatment, the ratio of peak velocity flow in early diastole to that in late diastole remained > 1.80, whereas the ratio of early to late Doppler-derived mitral annulus velocity had a normal relaxation pattern.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results of this study indicated that a CRI of remifentanil administered along with a CRI of propofol does not impair left ventricular systolic and diastolic function in healthy dogs.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Marques (marcelvetcardio@hotmail.com).