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Sedative and cardiopulmonary effects of buccally administered detomidine gel and reversal with atipamezole in dogs

Jennifer I. Kasten DVM1, Kristen M. Messenger DVM, PhD2, and Nigel B. Campbell BVetMed, PhD3
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  • 1 Large Animal and Tomlyn Business Unit, Vetoquinol USA, 4250 N Sylvania Ave, Fort Worth, TX 76137.
  • | 2 Department of Molecular Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27607.
  • | 3 Dick White Referrals, Station Farm, London Road, Six Mile Bottom, Cambridgeshire CB8 0UH, England.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate hemodynamic, respiratory, and sedative effects of buccally administered detomidine gel and reversal with atipamezole in dogs.

ANIMALS 8 adult purpose-bred dogs.

PROCEDURES Arterial and venous catheters were placed. Baseline heart rate, respiratory rate, cardiac output (determined via lithium dilution with pulse contour analysis), oxygen delivery, systemic vascular resistance, arterial blood gas values, and sedation score were obtained. Detomidine gel (2.0 mg/m2) was administered on the buccal mucosa. Cardiopulmonary data and sedation scores were obtained at predetermined times over 180 minutes. Atipamezole (0.1 mg/kg) was administered IM at 150 minutes. Reversal of sedation was timed and scored. Data were analyzed with an ANOVA.

RESULTS Compared with baseline values, heart rate was lower at 45 to 150 minutes, cardiac output and oxygen delivery were lower at 30 to 150 minutes, and systemic vascular resistance was increased at 30 to 150 minutes. There were no significant changes in Paco2, Pao2, or lactate concentration at any time point, compared with baseline values, except for lactate concentration at 180 minutes. All dogs became sedated; maximum sedation was detected 75 minutes after administration of detomidine. Mean ± SD time to recovery after atipamezole administration was 7.55 ± 1.89 minutes; sedation was completely reversed in all dogs. No adverse events were detected.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Buccally administered detomidine gel was associated with reliable and reversible sedation in dogs, with hemodynamic effects similar to those induced by other α2-adrenoceptor agonists. Buccally administered detomidine gel could be an alternative to injectable sedatives in healthy dogs.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate hemodynamic, respiratory, and sedative effects of buccally administered detomidine gel and reversal with atipamezole in dogs.

ANIMALS 8 adult purpose-bred dogs.

PROCEDURES Arterial and venous catheters were placed. Baseline heart rate, respiratory rate, cardiac output (determined via lithium dilution with pulse contour analysis), oxygen delivery, systemic vascular resistance, arterial blood gas values, and sedation score were obtained. Detomidine gel (2.0 mg/m2) was administered on the buccal mucosa. Cardiopulmonary data and sedation scores were obtained at predetermined times over 180 minutes. Atipamezole (0.1 mg/kg) was administered IM at 150 minutes. Reversal of sedation was timed and scored. Data were analyzed with an ANOVA.

RESULTS Compared with baseline values, heart rate was lower at 45 to 150 minutes, cardiac output and oxygen delivery were lower at 30 to 150 minutes, and systemic vascular resistance was increased at 30 to 150 minutes. There were no significant changes in Paco2, Pao2, or lactate concentration at any time point, compared with baseline values, except for lactate concentration at 180 minutes. All dogs became sedated; maximum sedation was detected 75 minutes after administration of detomidine. Mean ± SD time to recovery after atipamezole administration was 7.55 ± 1.89 minutes; sedation was completely reversed in all dogs. No adverse events were detected.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Buccally administered detomidine gel was associated with reliable and reversible sedation in dogs, with hemodynamic effects similar to those induced by other α2-adrenoceptor agonists. Buccally administered detomidine gel could be an alternative to injectable sedatives in healthy dogs.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Messenger (kmmessen@ncsu.edu).