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Quantitation of anti–Pythium insidiosum antibodies before and after administration of an immunotherapeutic product to healthy dogs

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  • 1 Department of Pathobiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803.
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803.
  • | 3 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effect of an immunotherapeutic product on concentrations of anti–Pythium insidiosum antibodies in dogs.

ANIMALS 7 healthy hound-crossbreds.

PROCEDURES Antibody concentrations were evaluated before (day 0) and after administration of the immunotherapeutic product. The immunotherapeutic product was administered on days 0, 7, and 21. Serum was obtained on days 0, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 42, 49, and 56. Anti–P insidiosum antibody concentrations were measured and reported as the percentage positivity relative to results for a strongly positive control serum.

RESULTS Mean ± SD percentage positivity before administration of the immunotherapeutic product was 7.45 ± 3.02%. There was no significant change in anti–P insidiosum antibody concentrations after administration of the product, with percentage positivity values in all dogs remaining within the range expected for healthy dogs (3% to 15%).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Administration of the immunotherapeutic product to healthy dogs in accordance with the manufacturer's suggested protocol did not induce a significant change in anti–P insidiosum antibody concentrations. These results suggested that administration of the immunotherapeutic product may not interfere with postadministration serologic monitoring. However, further investigations will be required to determine whether there is a similar effect in naturally infected dogs.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effect of an immunotherapeutic product on concentrations of anti–Pythium insidiosum antibodies in dogs.

ANIMALS 7 healthy hound-crossbreds.

PROCEDURES Antibody concentrations were evaluated before (day 0) and after administration of the immunotherapeutic product. The immunotherapeutic product was administered on days 0, 7, and 21. Serum was obtained on days 0, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35, 42, 49, and 56. Anti–P insidiosum antibody concentrations were measured and reported as the percentage positivity relative to results for a strongly positive control serum.

RESULTS Mean ± SD percentage positivity before administration of the immunotherapeutic product was 7.45 ± 3.02%. There was no significant change in anti–P insidiosum antibody concentrations after administration of the product, with percentage positivity values in all dogs remaining within the range expected for healthy dogs (3% to 15%).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Administration of the immunotherapeutic product to healthy dogs in accordance with the manufacturer's suggested protocol did not induce a significant change in anti–P insidiosum antibody concentrations. These results suggested that administration of the immunotherapeutic product may not interfere with postadministration serologic monitoring. However, further investigations will be required to determine whether there is a similar effect in naturally infected dogs.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Arsuaga-Zorrilla's present address is Division of Veterinary Resources, National Institutes of Health Animal Center, 16701 Elmer School Rd, Dickerson, MD 20842.

Address correspondence to Dr. Pucheu-Haston (cpucheu@lsu.edu).