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Effects of enzyme and cryoprotectant concentrations on yield of equine adipose-derived multipotent stromal cells

Wei Duan PhD1 and Mandi J. Lopez DVM, PhD2
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  • 1 Laboratory for Equine and Comparative Orthopedic Research, Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803.
  • | 2 Laboratory for Equine and Comparative Orthopedic Research, Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate effects of various concentrations of collagenase and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) on yield of equine adipose-derived multipotent stromal cells (ASCs) before and after cryopreservation.

SAMPLE Supragluteal subcutaneous adipose tissue from 7 Thoroughbreds.

PROCEDURES Tissues were incubated with digests containing 0.1%, 0.05%, or 0.025% type I collagenase. Part of each resulting stromal vascular fraction was cryopreserved in 80% fetal bovine serum (FBS), 10% DMSO, and 10% Dulbecco modified Eagle medium F-12 and in 95% FBS and 5% DMSO. Half of each fresh and cryopreserved heterogeneous cell population was not immunophenotyped (unsorted) or was immunophenotyped for CD44+, CD105+, and major histocompatability complex class II (MHCII; CD44+-CD105+-MHCII+ cells and CD44+-CD105+-MHCII cells). Cell proliferation (cell viability assay), plasticity (CFU frequency), and lineage-specific target gene and oncogene expression (reverse transcriptase PCR assays) were determined in passage 1 cells before and after culture in induction media.

RESULTS Digestion with 0.1% collagenase yielded the highest number of nucleated cells. Cell surface marker expression and proliferation rate were not affected by collagenase concentration. Cryopreservation reduced cell expansion rate and CD44+-CD105+-MHCII CFUs; it also reduced osteogenic plasticity of unsorted cells. However, effects appeared to be unrelated to DMSO concentrations. There were also variable effects on primordial gene expression among cell isolates.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results supported the use of 0.1% collagenase in an adipose tissue digest and 5% DMSO in cryopreservation medium for isolation and cryopreservation, respectively, of equine ASCs. These results may be used as guidelines for standardization of isolation and cryopreservation procedures for equine ASCs.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Lopez (mlopez@lsu.edu).