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Evaluation of equine synovial-derived extracellular matrix scaffolds seeded with equine synovial-derived mesenchymal stem cells

Nathalie A. Reisbig VetMed, MS1, Hayam A. Hussein BVetMed, PhD2, Erin Pinnell BS3, and Alicia L. Bertone DVM, PhD4
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  • 1 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.
  • | 3 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.
  • | 4 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To create a bioactive synovium scaffold by infusing decellularized synovial-derived extracellular matrix (synECM) with synovial-derived mesenchymal stem cells (synMSCs).

SAMPLE Synovium from the femoropatellar and medial femorotibial joints of equine cadavers.

PROCEDURES The synMSCs were cultured in monolayer and not treated or cotransduced to enhance expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and human bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2. The synECM was decellularized with 0.1% peracetic acid and then seeded with synMSCs (0.5 × 106 cells/0.5 mL) by use of a 30% serum gradient. Samples were evaluated on days 0, 3, 7, and 14. Cell migration, differentiation, and distribution into the synECMs were determined by cell surface marker CD90, viability, histologic morphology, and fluorescence microscopy results and expression of GFP, BMP-2, hyaluronan (HA), and proteoglycan (PG).

RESULTS At day 14, synMSCs were viable and had multiplied 2.5-fold in the synECMs. The synECMs seeded with synMSCs had a significant decrease in CD90 expression and significant increases in HA and PG expression. The synECMs seeded with synMSCs cotransduced with GFP, or BMP-2 had a significant increase in BMP-2 expression.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The synECM seeded with synMSCs or synMSCs cotransduced with GFP, or BMP-2 yielded a bioactive synovial scaffold. Expression of BMP-2 by synMSCs cotransduced to enhance expression of BMP-2 or GFP and an accompanying increase in both HA and PG expression indicated production of anabolic agents and synoviocyte differentiation in the scaffold. Because BMP-2 can promote repair of damaged cartilage, such a bioactive scaffold could be useful for treatment of injured cartilage.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Bertone (Bertone.1@osu.edu).