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Comparison of tensile strength and time to closure between an intermittent Aberdeen suture pattern and conventional methods of closure for the body wall of dogs

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  • 1 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.
  • | 2 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.
  • | 3 Department of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.
  • | 4 Department of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.
  • | 5 Department of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To compare tensile strength and time to completion of body wall closure among 3 suture patterns.

SAMPLE Eighteen 5 × 5-cm leather specimens and sixty-eight 5 × 5-cm full-thickness tissue specimens from the ventral portion of the abdominal body wall of 17 canine cadavers.

PROCEDURES During experiment 1 of a 2-experiment study, each leather specimen was cut in half and sutured with a simple interrupted or simple continuous pattern or continuous pattern with intermittent Aberdeen knots (intermittent Aberdeen pattern). During experiment 2, 4 tissue specimens were obtained from each cadaver; the linea alba of 3 specimens was incised and closed with 1 of the 3 suture patterns evaluated in experiment 1, and the fourth specimen was left intact as a control. All leather and tissue specimens underwent mechanical testing. Time to completion, mode of failure, and maximum force at failure (Fmax) were compared among the suture patterns.

RESULTS In experiment 1, the mean Fmax for the simple continuous and intermittent Aberdeen patterns was significantly greater than that for the simple interrupted pattern. In experiment 2, the mean Fmax for specimens obtained cranial to the umbilicus was greater than that for specimens obtained caudal to the umbilicus, and the mean time to completion for both continuous suture patterns was significantly less than that for the simple interrupted pattern. Most (34/51) sutured tissue specimens failed because the suture cut through the tissue at the suture-tissue interface.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that the intermittent Aberdeen pattern may be an alternative for body wall closure in dogs.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Upchurch (upchuda@gmail.com).