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Fluoroscopic evaluation of diaphragmatic excursion during spontaneous breathing in healthy Beagles

Sohyeon Moon DVM1, Seungjo Park DVM2, Sang-Kwon Lee DVM3, Byunggyu Cheon DVM4, and Jihye Choi DVM, PhD5
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  • 1 College of Veterinary Medicine and BK 21 Plus Project Team, Chonnam National University, 77, Yongbong-ro, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500–757, Republic of Korea.
  • | 2 College of Veterinary Medicine and BK 21 Plus Project Team, Chonnam National University, 77, Yongbong-ro, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500–757, Republic of Korea.
  • | 3 College of Veterinary Medicine and BK 21 Plus Project Team, Chonnam National University, 77, Yongbong-ro, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500–757, Republic of Korea.
  • | 4 College of Veterinary Medicine and BK 21 Plus Project Team, Chonnam National University, 77, Yongbong-ro, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500–757, Republic of Korea.
  • | 5 College of Veterinary Medicine and BK 21 Plus Project Team, Chonnam National University, 77, Yongbong-ro, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500–757, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate dynamic movement of the diaphragm of clinically normal dogs by use of fluoroscopy and to obtain quantitative data of diaphragmatic excursion during spontaneous breathing.

ANIMALS 8 healthy male Beagles with no history of respiratory tract disease.

PROCEDURES Fluoroscopy was performed during stabilized respiratory conditions. The beam center was located at the level of the diaphragm, and diaphragmatic motion was recorded during 3 respiratory cycles in dogs positioned in left lateral, right lateral, and dorsal recumbency. Extent of excursion of the diaphragmatic cupula and both crura, difference in excursion between the left and right crura, and ratios of the excursions of the diaphragmatic cupula and left and right crura to the length of the eighth thoracic vertebra were determined.

RESULTS Diaphragmatic crural excursion was symmetric for dogs in right lateral recumbency, and the crural excursion was approximately three-quarters of the vertebral length; however, crural excursion appeared to be asymmetric for dogs in left lateral recumbency. Mean ± SD difference in excursion between the right and left crura was 22.68 ± 8.68% for left lateral recumbency, 16.63 ± 9.22% for right lateral recumbency, and 18.11 ± 12.96% for dorsal recumbency.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that the fluoroscopic view of a dog positioned in right lateral recumbency may allow better evaluation of the symmetry of diaphragmatic excursion, compared with results for other recumbency positions. This study provided quantitative data on the excursion of diaphragmatic movement observed by use of fluoroscopy in clinically normal Beagles.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate dynamic movement of the diaphragm of clinically normal dogs by use of fluoroscopy and to obtain quantitative data of diaphragmatic excursion during spontaneous breathing.

ANIMALS 8 healthy male Beagles with no history of respiratory tract disease.

PROCEDURES Fluoroscopy was performed during stabilized respiratory conditions. The beam center was located at the level of the diaphragm, and diaphragmatic motion was recorded during 3 respiratory cycles in dogs positioned in left lateral, right lateral, and dorsal recumbency. Extent of excursion of the diaphragmatic cupula and both crura, difference in excursion between the left and right crura, and ratios of the excursions of the diaphragmatic cupula and left and right crura to the length of the eighth thoracic vertebra were determined.

RESULTS Diaphragmatic crural excursion was symmetric for dogs in right lateral recumbency, and the crural excursion was approximately three-quarters of the vertebral length; however, crural excursion appeared to be asymmetric for dogs in left lateral recumbency. Mean ± SD difference in excursion between the right and left crura was 22.68 ± 8.68% for left lateral recumbency, 16.63 ± 9.22% for right lateral recumbency, and 18.11 ± 12.96% for dorsal recumbency.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that the fluoroscopic view of a dog positioned in right lateral recumbency may allow better evaluation of the symmetry of diaphragmatic excursion, compared with results for other recumbency positions. This study provided quantitative data on the excursion of diaphragmatic movement observed by use of fluoroscopy in clinically normal Beagles.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Choi (imsono@jnu.ac.kr).