Use of gadoxetic acid for computed tomographic cholangiography in healthy dogs

Jennifer Chau Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia.

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Juan M. Podadera Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia.

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Alex C. Young Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia.

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Mariano A. Makara Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia.

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effect of gadoxetic acid (contrast) dose on biliary tract enhancement, determine the optimal time after contrast injection for CT image acquisition, and assess the feasibility of CT cholangiography in sedated dogs.

ANIMALS 8 healthy dogs.

PROCEDURES The study had 2 parts. In part 1, 4 dogs were anesthetized and underwent CT cholangiography twice. Gadoxetic acid was administered IV at a low dose (0.025 mmol/kg) for the first procedure and high dose (0.3 mmol/kg) for the second procedure. Serial CT scans were obtained at predetermined times after contrast injection. In part 2, 4 dogs were sedated and underwent CT angiography 85 minutes after IV administration of the high contrast dose. Contrast enhancement of the biliary tract on all scans was objectively assessed by measurement of CT attenuation and qualitatively assessed by use of a subjective 4-point scoring system by 3 independent reviewers. All measurements were compared over time and between contrast doses for the dogs of part 1. Subjective measurements were compared between the sedated dogs of part 2 and anesthetized dogs of part 1.

RESULTS Enhancement of the biliary tract was positively associated with contrast dose and time after contrast injection. Optimal enhancement was achieved 65 minutes after contrast injection. Subjective visualization of most biliary structures did not differ significantly between sedated and anesthetized dogs.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated CT cholangiography with gadoxetic acid was feasible in sedated dogs. The high contrast dose provided better visualization of biliary structures than the low dose; CT scans should be obtained 65 minutes after contrast injection.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effect of gadoxetic acid (contrast) dose on biliary tract enhancement, determine the optimal time after contrast injection for CT image acquisition, and assess the feasibility of CT cholangiography in sedated dogs.

ANIMALS 8 healthy dogs.

PROCEDURES The study had 2 parts. In part 1, 4 dogs were anesthetized and underwent CT cholangiography twice. Gadoxetic acid was administered IV at a low dose (0.025 mmol/kg) for the first procedure and high dose (0.3 mmol/kg) for the second procedure. Serial CT scans were obtained at predetermined times after contrast injection. In part 2, 4 dogs were sedated and underwent CT angiography 85 minutes after IV administration of the high contrast dose. Contrast enhancement of the biliary tract on all scans was objectively assessed by measurement of CT attenuation and qualitatively assessed by use of a subjective 4-point scoring system by 3 independent reviewers. All measurements were compared over time and between contrast doses for the dogs of part 1. Subjective measurements were compared between the sedated dogs of part 2 and anesthetized dogs of part 1.

RESULTS Enhancement of the biliary tract was positively associated with contrast dose and time after contrast injection. Optimal enhancement was achieved 65 minutes after contrast injection. Subjective visualization of most biliary structures did not differ significantly between sedated and anesthetized dogs.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated CT cholangiography with gadoxetic acid was feasible in sedated dogs. The high contrast dose provided better visualization of biliary structures than the low dose; CT scans should be obtained 65 minutes after contrast injection.

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