Alterations in conjunctival bacteria and antimicrobial susceptibility during topical administration of ofloxacin after cataract surgery in dogs

Lynne S. Sandmeyer Departments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5B4, Canada.

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Bianca S. Bauer Departments of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5B4, Canada.

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Seyed Mohammad Mohaghegh Poor Department of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5E5, Canada.

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Cindy Xin Feng Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5B4, Canada.

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Manuel Chirino-Trejo Veterinary Microbiology, Western College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5B4, Canada.

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate changes in conjunctival bacteria and antimicrobial susceptibility of bacteria after cataract surgery in dogs.

ANIMALS 16 client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES Samples for aerobic and anaerobic culture were obtained from the conjunctival fornices of both eyes of dogs 24 hours before (week 0) and 1, 3, and 6 weeks after cataract surgery. Topical administration of ofloxacin (every 6 hours) was initiated 12 hours before surgery and continued for 3 weeks. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion and a commercially available test for ofloxacin.

RESULTS Frequency of positive culture results was significantly higher at week 6 than at weeks 0 and 1. Bacterial load was more likely to be moderate or high at weeks 3 and 6 than at weeks 0 and 1. The most frequently cultured organism was Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (21/78 [26.9%]), followed by coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp (19/78 [24.4%]). Staphylococcus pseudintermedius was the organism most frequently cultured at weeks 0 (5/12), 1 (4/12), and 6 (8/19), whereas frequency of this organism was lowest at week 3 (1/20). In contrast, coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp were the most frequently cultured organisms at week 3 (10/20). There was a significant increase in the proportion of organisms resistant to ofloxacin at week 3, compared with the proportion at week 0.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The number of bacterial organisms increased and the population of conjunctival bacteria was altered and had a higher proportion resistant to ofloxacin during the 6 weeks after cataract surgery for dogs treated by use of this protocol.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate changes in conjunctival bacteria and antimicrobial susceptibility of bacteria after cataract surgery in dogs.

ANIMALS 16 client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES Samples for aerobic and anaerobic culture were obtained from the conjunctival fornices of both eyes of dogs 24 hours before (week 0) and 1, 3, and 6 weeks after cataract surgery. Topical administration of ofloxacin (every 6 hours) was initiated 12 hours before surgery and continued for 3 weeks. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion and a commercially available test for ofloxacin.

RESULTS Frequency of positive culture results was significantly higher at week 6 than at weeks 0 and 1. Bacterial load was more likely to be moderate or high at weeks 3 and 6 than at weeks 0 and 1. The most frequently cultured organism was Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (21/78 [26.9%]), followed by coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp (19/78 [24.4%]). Staphylococcus pseudintermedius was the organism most frequently cultured at weeks 0 (5/12), 1 (4/12), and 6 (8/19), whereas frequency of this organism was lowest at week 3 (1/20). In contrast, coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp were the most frequently cultured organisms at week 3 (10/20). There was a significant increase in the proportion of organisms resistant to ofloxacin at week 3, compared with the proportion at week 0.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The number of bacterial organisms increased and the population of conjunctival bacteria was altered and had a higher proportion resistant to ofloxacin during the 6 weeks after cataract surgery for dogs treated by use of this protocol.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Sandmeyer (lynne.sandmeyer@usask.ca).

Dr. Mohaghegh Poor's present address is Department of Radiation Oncology, Max Rady College of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3E 3P5, Canada.

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