Effect of meloxicam administration on movement, feeding, and drinking behaviors of transported and nontransported cattle

Sarah F. Capik Department of Diagnostic Medicine/Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.

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 DVM, PhD
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Brad J. White Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.

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Robert L. Larson Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.

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Nicholas Van Engen Department of Veterinary Diagnostic and Production Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50010.

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Johann F. Coetzee Department of Veterinary Diagnostic and Production Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50010.

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 BVSc, PhD

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effects of meloxicam on movement, feeding, and drinking behaviors of transported and nontransported cattle.

ANIMALS 100 crossbred beef steers.

PROCEDURES During experiment 1 of a 2-experiment study, calves from a livestock auction received meloxicam (1 mg/kg, PO; n = 50) or a lactose placebo (1 capsule/calf; 50; control), then calves were transported approximately 1,000 km overnight to a feedlot, where they were instrumented with a real-time location-monitoring ear tag, placed in randomly assigned pens (n = 5 pens/treatment), and monitored for 21 days. During experiment 2, calves in pens were administered the treatment opposite that of experiment 1, returned to their pens without undergoing transportation, and monitored for another 21 days. For each experiment, mean daily distance traveled and percentage time spent near feed (PNF) and water (PNW) were calculated on a pen basis and compared between treatments.

RESULTS During experiment 1, mean daily distance traveled, PNF, and PNW did not differ significantly between meloxicam-treated and control calves; however, all 3 behaviors varied significantly by day. During experiment 2, although mean distance traveled was significantly associated with the interaction between day and treatment, it did not differ significantly between meloxicam-treated and control calves within any specific day. Mean PNF and PNW were significantly associated with day only, although no pattern in that effect was evident.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that a single dose of meloxicam prior to transportation did not significantly affect the behaviors of transported and nontransported calves.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effects of meloxicam on movement, feeding, and drinking behaviors of transported and nontransported cattle.

ANIMALS 100 crossbred beef steers.

PROCEDURES During experiment 1 of a 2-experiment study, calves from a livestock auction received meloxicam (1 mg/kg, PO; n = 50) or a lactose placebo (1 capsule/calf; 50; control), then calves were transported approximately 1,000 km overnight to a feedlot, where they were instrumented with a real-time location-monitoring ear tag, placed in randomly assigned pens (n = 5 pens/treatment), and monitored for 21 days. During experiment 2, calves in pens were administered the treatment opposite that of experiment 1, returned to their pens without undergoing transportation, and monitored for another 21 days. For each experiment, mean daily distance traveled and percentage time spent near feed (PNF) and water (PNW) were calculated on a pen basis and compared between treatments.

RESULTS During experiment 1, mean daily distance traveled, PNF, and PNW did not differ significantly between meloxicam-treated and control calves; however, all 3 behaviors varied significantly by day. During experiment 2, although mean distance traveled was significantly associated with the interaction between day and treatment, it did not differ significantly between meloxicam-treated and control calves within any specific day. Mean PNF and PNW were significantly associated with day only, although no pattern in that effect was evident.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that a single dose of meloxicam prior to transportation did not significantly affect the behaviors of transported and nontransported calves.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Capik's present address is Texas A&M AgriLife Research, Texas A&M University System, Amarillo, TX 79106; and the Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843.

Dr. Coetzee's present address is Department of Anatomy and Physiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.

Address correspondence to Dr. Capik (sarah.capik@ag.tamu.edu).
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