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Pulmonary disposition and pharmacokinetics of minocycline in adult horses

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  • 1 Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802.
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802.
  • | 3 Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.
  • | 4 Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802.
  • | 5 Department of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61802.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine pharmacokinetics and pulmonary disposition of minocycline in horses after IV and intragastric administration.

ANIMALS 7 healthy adult horses.

PROCEDURES For experiment 1 of the study, minocycline was administered IV (2.2 mg/kg) or intragastrically (4 mg/kg) to 6 horses by use of a randomized crossover design. Plasma samples were obtained before and 16 times within 36 hours after minocycline administration. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed 4 times within 24 hours after minocycline administration for collection of pulmonary epithelial lining fluid (PELF) and BAL cells. For experiment 2, minocycline was administered intragastrically (4 mg/kg, q 12 h, for 5 doses) to 6 horses. Plasma samples were obtained before and 20 times within 96 hours after minocycline administration. A BAL was performed 6 times within 72 hours after minocycline administration for collection of PELF samples and BAL cells.

RESULTS Mean bioavailability of minocycline was 48% (range, 35% to 75%). At steady state, mean ± SD maximum concentration (Cmax) of minocycline in plasma was 2.3 ± 1.3 μg/mL, and terminal half-life was 11.8 ± 0.5 hours. Median time to Cmax (Tmax) was 1.3 hours (interquartile range [IQR], 1.0 to 1.5 hours). The Cmax and Tmax of minocycline in the PELF were 10.5 ± 12.8 μg/mL and 9.0 hours (IQR, 5.5 to 12.0 hours), respectively. The Cmax and Tmax for BAL cells were 0.24 ± 0.1 μg/mL and 6.0 hours (IQR, 0 to 6.0 hours), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Minocycline was distributed into the PELF and BAL cells of adult horses.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Lascola (klascola@illinois.edu).