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Comparison of humoral insulin-like growth factor-1, platelet-derived growth factor-BB, transforming growth factor-β1, and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist concentrations among equine autologous blood-derived preparations

Christiane R. Ionita DVM1, Antonia R. Troillet DVM, Dr Med Vet2, Thomas W. Vahlenkamp DVM, Prof Dr Med Vet, PhD3, Karsten Winter Dr Rer Hum4, Walter Brehm DVM, Prof Dr Med Vet5, and Jean-Claude Ionita DVM, Dr Med Vet6
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  • 1 Large Animal Clinic for Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine of the University of Leipzig, 04103 Leipzig, Germany.
  • | 2 Large Animal Clinic for Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine of the University of Leipzig, 04103 Leipzig, Germany.
  • | 3 Virology Institute, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine of the University of Leipzig, 04103 Leipzig, Germany.
  • | 4 Translation Center for Regenerative Medicine, Faculty of Medicine of the University of Leipzig, 04103 Leipzig, Germany.
  • | 5 Large Animal Clinic for Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine of the University of Leipzig, 04103 Leipzig, Germany.
  • | 6 Large Animal Clinic for Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine of the University of Leipzig, 04103 Leipzig, Germany.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To compare humoral insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) concentrations in plasma and 3 types of equine autologous blood-derived preparations (ABPs).

SAMPLE Blood and ABP samples from 12 horses.

PROCEDURES Blood samples from each horse were processed by use of commercial systems to obtain plasma, platelet concentrate, conditioned serum, and aqueous platelet lysate. Half of the platelet concentrate samples were additionally treated with a detergent to release intracellular mediators. Humoral IGF-1, PDGF-BB, TGF-β1, and IL-1Ra concentrations were measured with ELISAs and compared statistically.

RESULTS Median IGF-1 concentration was highest in conditioned serum and detergent-treated platelet concentrate, followed by platelet concentrate and plasma; IGF-1 was not detected in platelet lysate. Mean PDGF-BB concentration was highest in platelet lysate, followed by detergent-treated platelet concentrate and conditioned serum; PDGF-BB was not detected in plasma and platelet concentrate. Median TGF-β1 concentration was highest in detergent-treated platelet concentrate, followed by conditioned serum, platelet lysate, and platelet concentrate; TGF-β1 was not detected in most plasma samples. Median IL-1Ra concentration was highest in platelet lysate, followed by conditioned serum; IL-1Ra was not detected in almost all plasma, detergent-treated platelet concentrate, and platelet concentrate samples.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Each ABP had its own cytokine profile, which was determined by the specific processing method. Coagulation and cellular lysis strongly increased humoral concentrations of cell-derived cytokines. No ABP had the highest concentrations for all cytokines. Further studies are needed to assess clinical relevance of these findings.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To compare humoral insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) concentrations in plasma and 3 types of equine autologous blood-derived preparations (ABPs).

SAMPLE Blood and ABP samples from 12 horses.

PROCEDURES Blood samples from each horse were processed by use of commercial systems to obtain plasma, platelet concentrate, conditioned serum, and aqueous platelet lysate. Half of the platelet concentrate samples were additionally treated with a detergent to release intracellular mediators. Humoral IGF-1, PDGF-BB, TGF-β1, and IL-1Ra concentrations were measured with ELISAs and compared statistically.

RESULTS Median IGF-1 concentration was highest in conditioned serum and detergent-treated platelet concentrate, followed by platelet concentrate and plasma; IGF-1 was not detected in platelet lysate. Mean PDGF-BB concentration was highest in platelet lysate, followed by detergent-treated platelet concentrate and conditioned serum; PDGF-BB was not detected in plasma and platelet concentrate. Median TGF-β1 concentration was highest in detergent-treated platelet concentrate, followed by conditioned serum, platelet lysate, and platelet concentrate; TGF-β1 was not detected in most plasma samples. Median IL-1Ra concentration was highest in platelet lysate, followed by conditioned serum; IL-1Ra was not detected in almost all plasma, detergent-treated platelet concentrate, and platelet concentrate samples.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Each ABP had its own cytokine profile, which was determined by the specific processing method. Coagulation and cellular lysis strongly increased humoral concentrations of cell-derived cytokines. No ABP had the highest concentrations for all cytokines. Further studies are needed to assess clinical relevance of these findings.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Christiane R. Ionita's present address is Pferdeklinik am Kottenforst, Beckers Kreuz 25, 53343 Wachtberg, Germany.

Dr. Troillet's present address is Tierärztliche Klinik für Pferde Meerbusch, Schützenstr. 20, 40668 Meerbusch, Germany.

Dr. Jean-Claude Ionita's present address is Rüdigerstr. 84, 53179 Bonn, Germany.

Address correspondence to Dr. Jean-Claude Ionita (ionita@vetmed.uni-leipzig.de).