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Prevalence of naturally occurring antibodies against dog erythrocyte antigen 7 in a population of dog erythrocyte antigen 7–negative dogs from Spain and Italy

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  • 1 Veterinary Transfusion Unit, Department of Health, Animal Science and Food Safety, University of Milan, 20133 Milan, Italy.
  • | 2 Veterinary Transfusion Unit, Department of Health, Animal Science and Food Safety, University of Milan, 20133 Milan, Italy.
  • | 3 Centro de Transfusión Veterinario, Arturo Soria 267, 28033 Madrid, Spain.
  • | 4 Laboratorio de Análisis Clinico, Hospital Clinico Veterinario, Universidad Alfonso X El Sabio, 28691 Madrid, Spain.
  • | 5 Veterinary Clinic Hospital, University CEU Cardenal Herrera, 46113 Valencia, Spain.
  • | 6 Veterinary Transfusion Unit, Department of Health, Animal Science and Food Safety, University of Milan, 20133 Milan, Italy.
  • | 7 Veterinary Transfusion Unit, Department of Health, Animal Science and Food Safety, University of Milan, 20133 Milan, Italy.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the prevalence of naturally occurring anti-dog erythrocyte antigen (DEA) 7 antibodies in DEA 7–negative dogs from Spain and Italy.

ANIMALS 252 DEA 7–negative dogs from a population of 312 dogs that were previously tested for DEA 1, DEA 4, and DEA 7.

PROCEDURES A plasma sample was obtained from each dog and evaluated for anti-DEA 7 antibodies by the use of gel column agglutination. Each plasma sample underwent major crossmatching with RBCs from DEA 7-positive dogs. Samples that resulted in agglutination were then crossmatched with RBCs from DEA 1-negative, DEA 4-positive, and DEA 7–negative dogs to confirm the presence of anti-DEA 7 antibodies. Results were then used to calculate the risk for a delayed transfusion reaction in a DEA 7–negative dog with anti-DEA 7 antibodies after a transfusion with blood that was not crossmatched or typed for DEA 7.

RESULTS 96 of 252 (38.1%) plasma samples contained anti-DEA 7 antibodies. A DEA 7–negative dog with anti-DEA 7 antibodies had a 5.9% chance of developing a delayed hemolytic reaction after transfusion with blood not crossmatched or typed for DEA 7.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that canine blood used for transfusion should be crossmatched with the blood or plasma of the intended recipient prior to transfusion to minimize the likelihood that the recipient will develop a hemolytic reaction associated with anti-DEA 7 antibodies. Ideal canine blood donors should be negative for both DEA 1 and DEA 7.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the prevalence of naturally occurring anti-dog erythrocyte antigen (DEA) 7 antibodies in DEA 7–negative dogs from Spain and Italy.

ANIMALS 252 DEA 7–negative dogs from a population of 312 dogs that were previously tested for DEA 1, DEA 4, and DEA 7.

PROCEDURES A plasma sample was obtained from each dog and evaluated for anti-DEA 7 antibodies by the use of gel column agglutination. Each plasma sample underwent major crossmatching with RBCs from DEA 7-positive dogs. Samples that resulted in agglutination were then crossmatched with RBCs from DEA 1-negative, DEA 4-positive, and DEA 7–negative dogs to confirm the presence of anti-DEA 7 antibodies. Results were then used to calculate the risk for a delayed transfusion reaction in a DEA 7–negative dog with anti-DEA 7 antibodies after a transfusion with blood that was not crossmatched or typed for DEA 7.

RESULTS 96 of 252 (38.1%) plasma samples contained anti-DEA 7 antibodies. A DEA 7–negative dog with anti-DEA 7 antibodies had a 5.9% chance of developing a delayed hemolytic reaction after transfusion with blood not crossmatched or typed for DEA 7.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that canine blood used for transfusion should be crossmatched with the blood or plasma of the intended recipient prior to transfusion to minimize the likelihood that the recipient will develop a hemolytic reaction associated with anti-DEA 7 antibodies. Ideal canine blood donors should be negative for both DEA 1 and DEA 7.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Spada (eva.spada@unimi.it).