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Safety and toxicokinetic profiles associated with daily oral administration of grapiprant, a selective antagonist of the prostaglandin E2 EP4 receptor, to cats

Lesley C. Rausch-Derra DVM, MS1 and Linda Rhodes VMD, PhD2
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  • 1 Aratana Therapeutics, 11400 Tomahawk Creek Pkwy, Ste 340, Leawood, KS 66211.
  • | 2 Aratana Therapeutics, 11400 Tomahawk Creek Pkwy, Ste 340, Leawood, KS 66211.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate safety and toxicokinetic profiles associated with daily oral administration of grapiprant, a new analgesic that selectively blocks the prostaglandin E2 EP4 receptor, to cats.

ANIMALS 24 healthy domestic shorthair cats (12 males and 12 females).

PROCEDURES Cats were randomly assigned (3 of each sex/group) to receive a placebo capsule or grapiprant at 3, 9, or 15 mg/kg, administered PO once daily for 28 days, beginning on day 0. Food consumption and behavior were observed daily, body weight was measured weekly, and clinicopathologic tests were performed on blood and urine samples collected on days −7, 14, and 25. Blood samples for toxicokinetic analyses were collected after treatment on days 0 and 27. Cats were euthanized on day 28, and full necropsies and histologic evaluations were performed.

RESULTS Grapiprant rapidly reached peak serum concentrations and maintained substantial concentrations throughout the 28-day period. By day 27, maximum serum concentrations ranged from 683 ng/mL to 4,950 ng/mL, which were attained by 1 to 4 hours after administration. Serum half-lives on day 27 ranged from approximately 2 to 14 hours (median, approx 5 to 6 hours). Grapiprant was well tolerated, and no adverse effects were detected at doses ≤ 15 mg/kg. No significant effects of grapiprant were identified on body weight, food consumption, clinicopathologic variables, or gross or histologic necropsy findings.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested the safety of daily oral administration of grapiprant to cats. Additional studies are needed to evaluate the efficacy of grapiprant for treatment of cats with osteoarthritis.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Rausch-Derra (lrausch-derra@aratana.com).