Circadian and postprandial variation in plasma citrulline concentration in healthy dogs

Julien M. Dahan Department of Clinical Sciences and the Clinical Research Unit, National Veterinary School of Toulouse, University of Toulouse, 31076 Toulouse Cedex 3, France.

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Celine Giron Department of Clinical Sciences and the Clinical Research Unit, National Veterinary School of Toulouse, University of Toulouse, 31076 Toulouse Cedex 3, France.

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Didier Concordet Department of Biological Sciences, National Veterinary School of Toulouse, University of Toulouse, 31076 Toulouse Cedex 3, France.

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Olivier Dossin Department of Clinical Sciences and the Clinical Research Unit, National Veterinary School of Toulouse, University of Toulouse, 31076 Toulouse Cedex 3, France.

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate circadian and postprandial variations in plasma citrulline concentration in healthy dogs.

ANIMALS 8 healthy Beagles.

PROCEDURES Blood samples were collected from dogs after 12 hours of food withholding (0 hours; 8:00 am) and then every 2 hours for 12 hours (until 8:00 pm) and again at 24 hours (8:00 am the next day). The same protocol was repeated, with the only difference being that a meal was given immediately after the 0-hour sample collection point. Plasma citrulline concentration was measured by ion exchange chromatography.

RESULTS No significant difference in plasma citrulline concentration was identified among measurement points when food was withheld. Mean ± SD plasma citrulline concentration at 4 hours (72.2 ± 12.7 μmol/L) and 24 hours (56.1 ± 12.5 μmol/L) after dogs were fed was significantly different from that at 0 hours (64.4 ± 12.7 μmol/L).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Plasma citrulline concentration had no circadian variation in unfed dogs but increased significantly in fed dogs 4 hours after a meal. Therefore, food should be withheld from dogs for 8 to 12 hours before blood sample collection for measurement of citrulline concentration.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate circadian and postprandial variations in plasma citrulline concentration in healthy dogs.

ANIMALS 8 healthy Beagles.

PROCEDURES Blood samples were collected from dogs after 12 hours of food withholding (0 hours; 8:00 am) and then every 2 hours for 12 hours (until 8:00 pm) and again at 24 hours (8:00 am the next day). The same protocol was repeated, with the only difference being that a meal was given immediately after the 0-hour sample collection point. Plasma citrulline concentration was measured by ion exchange chromatography.

RESULTS No significant difference in plasma citrulline concentration was identified among measurement points when food was withheld. Mean ± SD plasma citrulline concentration at 4 hours (72.2 ± 12.7 μmol/L) and 24 hours (56.1 ± 12.5 μmol/L) after dogs were fed was significantly different from that at 0 hours (64.4 ± 12.7 μmol/L).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Plasma citrulline concentration had no circadian variation in unfed dogs but increased significantly in fed dogs 4 hours after a meal. Therefore, food should be withheld from dogs for 8 to 12 hours before blood sample collection for measurement of citrulline concentration.

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