Evaluation of autologous bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells on renal regeneration after experimentally induced acute kidney injury in dogs

Chae-Young Lim Department of Veterinary Internal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701, South Korea.

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Jae-Ik Han Department of Veterinary Internal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701, South Korea.

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Seung-Gon Kim Department of Veterinary Internal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701, South Korea.

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Chang-Min Lee Department of Veterinary Internal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701, South Korea.

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Hee-Myung Park Department of Veterinary Internal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Konkuk University, Seoul 143-701, South Korea.

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the usefulness of autologous bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cell (BM-MSC) therapy for the treatment of dogs with experimentally induced acute kidney injury.

ANIMALS 6 healthy dogs.

PROCEDURES After induction of kidney injury (day 0) with cisplatin (5 mg/kg, IV), dogs immediately received saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (10 mL; n = 3) or BM-MSCs (1 × 106 cells/kg in 10 mL of saline solution; 3) IV. A CBC, serum biochemical analysis, and urinalysis were performed for each dog before administration of cisplatin and on days 1 through 4. Glomerular filtration rate was determined for all dogs on days −7 and 2; BM-MSC tracking by MRI was performed on BM-MSC–treated dogs on days −14 and 4. After sample collection and BM-MSC tracking on day 4, all dogs were euthanized; kidney tissue samples underwent histologic evaluation, immunohistochemical analysis, and cytokine profiling via reverse transcriptase PCR assays.

RESULTS Kidney tissue from both groups had mononuclear inflammatory cell infiltration, tubular necrosis, dilated tubules, and glomerular damage. However, there was less fibrotic change and increased proliferation of renal tubular epithelial cells in the BM-MSC-treated dogs, compared with findings for the control dogs. Expressions of tumor necrosis factor-α and transforming growth factor-β were lower in the BM-MSC-treated group, compared with findings for the control group. Laboratory data revealed no improvement in the renal function in BM-MSC-treated dogs.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results of this study suggested that autologous BM-MSCs may accelerate renal regeneration after experimentally induced acute kidney injury in dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2016;77:208–217)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the usefulness of autologous bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cell (BM-MSC) therapy for the treatment of dogs with experimentally induced acute kidney injury.

ANIMALS 6 healthy dogs.

PROCEDURES After induction of kidney injury (day 0) with cisplatin (5 mg/kg, IV), dogs immediately received saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (10 mL; n = 3) or BM-MSCs (1 × 106 cells/kg in 10 mL of saline solution; 3) IV. A CBC, serum biochemical analysis, and urinalysis were performed for each dog before administration of cisplatin and on days 1 through 4. Glomerular filtration rate was determined for all dogs on days −7 and 2; BM-MSC tracking by MRI was performed on BM-MSC–treated dogs on days −14 and 4. After sample collection and BM-MSC tracking on day 4, all dogs were euthanized; kidney tissue samples underwent histologic evaluation, immunohistochemical analysis, and cytokine profiling via reverse transcriptase PCR assays.

RESULTS Kidney tissue from both groups had mononuclear inflammatory cell infiltration, tubular necrosis, dilated tubules, and glomerular damage. However, there was less fibrotic change and increased proliferation of renal tubular epithelial cells in the BM-MSC-treated dogs, compared with findings for the control dogs. Expressions of tumor necrosis factor-α and transforming growth factor-β were lower in the BM-MSC-treated group, compared with findings for the control group. Laboratory data revealed no improvement in the renal function in BM-MSC-treated dogs.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results of this study suggested that autologous BM-MSCs may accelerate renal regeneration after experimentally induced acute kidney injury in dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2016;77:208–217)

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