In vitro and in vivo assessment of platelet function in healthy dogs during administration of a low-dose aspirin regimen

Jillian M. Haines Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762.

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John M. Thomason Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762.

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Eileen C. Seage Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762.

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Robert W. Wills Department of Clinical Sciences Pathobiology and Population Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762.

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Camilo Bulla Department of Clinical Sciences Pathobiology and Population Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762.

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Kari V. Lunsford Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762.

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Andrew J. Mackin Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762.

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE To assess the in vitro and in vivo platelet function of healthy dogs during administration of a low-dose aspirin regimen.

ANIMALS 16 dogs.

PROCEDURES Dogs received aspirin (1 mg/kg, PO, q 24 h) for 7 days. Blood and urine samples were collected before (day 1; baseline) and on days 3 and 7 of the low-dose aspirin regimen. Platelet function was evaluated by use of turbidimetric and conventional impedance aggregometry, multiple-electrode impedance aggregometry, a platelet function analyzer (PFA), and determination of urine 11-dehydro-thromboxane B2 concentration. Turbidimetric aggregometry results were compared with the results obtained by the other 4 methods. Fourteen days after cessation of aspirin, platelet-rich plasma was incubated with acetylsalicylic acid and platelet function was assessed by turbidimetric aggregometry to determine whether this technique could accurately identify dogs that responded to the low-dose aspirin regimen.

RESULTS Of the 16 dogs, 13 had turbidimetric and conventional impedance aggregometry results that were decreased by > 25% from baseline on days 3 and 7, and 4 and 7 dogs had PFA closure times > 300 seconds on days 3 and 7, respectively. The median urine 11-dehydro-thromboxane B2 concentration–to–creatinine concentration ratio decreased by 49% between days 1 and 7. Turbidimetric aggregometry results were correlated with conventional impedance aggregometry results. There was poor agreement between the turbidimetric aggregometry and PFA results. The multiple-electrode impedance aggregometry protocol failed to reliably detect aspirin-induced platelet dysfunction. In vitro incubation of platelet-rich plasma with acetylsalicylic acid followed by turbidimetric aggregometry did not predict whether dogs responded to the low-dose aspirin regimen.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that the response to a low-dose aspirin regimen varied among healthy dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2016;77:174–185)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To assess the in vitro and in vivo platelet function of healthy dogs during administration of a low-dose aspirin regimen.

ANIMALS 16 dogs.

PROCEDURES Dogs received aspirin (1 mg/kg, PO, q 24 h) for 7 days. Blood and urine samples were collected before (day 1; baseline) and on days 3 and 7 of the low-dose aspirin regimen. Platelet function was evaluated by use of turbidimetric and conventional impedance aggregometry, multiple-electrode impedance aggregometry, a platelet function analyzer (PFA), and determination of urine 11-dehydro-thromboxane B2 concentration. Turbidimetric aggregometry results were compared with the results obtained by the other 4 methods. Fourteen days after cessation of aspirin, platelet-rich plasma was incubated with acetylsalicylic acid and platelet function was assessed by turbidimetric aggregometry to determine whether this technique could accurately identify dogs that responded to the low-dose aspirin regimen.

RESULTS Of the 16 dogs, 13 had turbidimetric and conventional impedance aggregometry results that were decreased by > 25% from baseline on days 3 and 7, and 4 and 7 dogs had PFA closure times > 300 seconds on days 3 and 7, respectively. The median urine 11-dehydro-thromboxane B2 concentration–to–creatinine concentration ratio decreased by 49% between days 1 and 7. Turbidimetric aggregometry results were correlated with conventional impedance aggregometry results. There was poor agreement between the turbidimetric aggregometry and PFA results. The multiple-electrode impedance aggregometry protocol failed to reliably detect aspirin-induced platelet dysfunction. In vitro incubation of platelet-rich plasma with acetylsalicylic acid followed by turbidimetric aggregometry did not predict whether dogs responded to the low-dose aspirin regimen.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that the response to a low-dose aspirin regimen varied among healthy dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2016;77:174–185)

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