Correlation of the ratio of caudal vena cava diameter and aorta diameter with systolic pressure variation in anesthetized dogs

Caterina Meneghini Department of Animal Medicine, Production and Health, School of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, University of Padua, 35020 Legnaro, Italy.

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Roberto Rabozzi Clinica Veterinaria Roma Sud, Via Pilade Mazza 24, Rome 00173, Italy.

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Paolo Franci Department of Animal Medicine, Production and Health, School of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, University of Padua, 35020 Legnaro, Italy.

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the correlation coefficient of the ratio between diameter of the caudal vena cava (CVC) and diameter of the aorta (Ao) in dogs as determined ultrasonographically with systolic pressure variation (SPV).

ANIMALS 14 client-owned dogs (9 females and 5 males; mean ± SD age, 73 ± 40 months; mean body weight, 22 ± 7 kg) that underwent anesthesia for repair of skin wounds.

PROCEDURES Anesthesia was induced. Controlled mechanical ventilation with a peak inspiratory pressure of 8 cm H2O was immediately started, and SPV was measured. During a brief period of suspension of ventilation, CVC-to-Ao ratio was measured on a transverse right-lateral intercostal ultrasonographic image obtained at the level of the porta hepatis. When the SPV was ≥ 4 mm Hg, at least 1 bolus (3 to 4 mL/kg) of Hartmann solution was administered IV during a 1-minute period. Bolus administration was stopped and the CVC-to-Ao ratio measured when SPV was < 4 mm Hg. Correlation coefficient analysis was performed.

RESULTS 28 measurements were obtained. The correlation coefficient was 0.86 (95% confidence interval, 0.72 to 0.93). Mean ± SD SPV and CVC-to-Ao ratio before bolus administration were 7 ± 2 mm Hg and 0.52 ± 0.16, respectively. Mean ± SD SPV and CVC-to-Ao ratio after bolus administration were 2 ± 0.6 mm Hg and 0.91 ± 0.13, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In this study, the CVC-to-Ao ratio was a feasible, noninvasive ultrasonographically determined value that correlated well with SPV. (Am J Vet Res 2016;77:137–143)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the correlation coefficient of the ratio between diameter of the caudal vena cava (CVC) and diameter of the aorta (Ao) in dogs as determined ultrasonographically with systolic pressure variation (SPV).

ANIMALS 14 client-owned dogs (9 females and 5 males; mean ± SD age, 73 ± 40 months; mean body weight, 22 ± 7 kg) that underwent anesthesia for repair of skin wounds.

PROCEDURES Anesthesia was induced. Controlled mechanical ventilation with a peak inspiratory pressure of 8 cm H2O was immediately started, and SPV was measured. During a brief period of suspension of ventilation, CVC-to-Ao ratio was measured on a transverse right-lateral intercostal ultrasonographic image obtained at the level of the porta hepatis. When the SPV was ≥ 4 mm Hg, at least 1 bolus (3 to 4 mL/kg) of Hartmann solution was administered IV during a 1-minute period. Bolus administration was stopped and the CVC-to-Ao ratio measured when SPV was < 4 mm Hg. Correlation coefficient analysis was performed.

RESULTS 28 measurements were obtained. The correlation coefficient was 0.86 (95% confidence interval, 0.72 to 0.93). Mean ± SD SPV and CVC-to-Ao ratio before bolus administration were 7 ± 2 mm Hg and 0.52 ± 0.16, respectively. Mean ± SD SPV and CVC-to-Ao ratio after bolus administration were 2 ± 0.6 mm Hg and 0.91 ± 0.13, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In this study, the CVC-to-Ao ratio was a feasible, noninvasive ultrasonographically determined value that correlated well with SPV. (Am J Vet Res 2016;77:137–143)

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