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Assessment of in vitro release of carboplatin from six carrier media

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  • 1 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Raleigh, NC 27607.
  • | 2 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Raleigh, NC 27607.
  • | 3 Department of Molecular Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Raleigh, NC 27607.
  • | 4 Department of Statistics, College of Sciences, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27607.
  • | 5 Department of Clinical Pharmacy Services, College of Veterinary Medicine, Raleigh, NC 27607.
  • | 6 Department of Molecular Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Raleigh, NC 27607.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To investigate in vitro carboplatin release from 6 carrier media.

SAMPLE 6 carboplatin-containing carrier media.

PROCEDURES An in vitro release study was performed with 6 commercially available carrier media: a hemostatic gelatin sponge, a poloxamer copolymer gel, and 2 sizes (3 and 4.8 mm in diameter) of beads molded from each of 2 commercial calcium sulfate products. All carrier media contained 10 mg of carboplatin. Carrier media specimens were placed in 37°C PBS solution for 96 hours. Carboplatin concentrations in PBS solution were measured by use of high-performance liquid chromatography at 15 time points to calculate the amount and proportion of carboplatin released from each specimen.

RESULTS Peak release of carboplatin from the poloxamer copolymer gel and hemostatic gelatin sponge were achieved after 4 and 20 hours, respectively. Maximum release did not differ significantly between the poloxamer copolymer gel and hemostatic gelatin sponge, but both released significantly more carboplatin within 96 hours than did both of the commercial calcium sulfate products. The poloxamer copolymer gel released 99% of the carboplatin, and the hemostatic gelatin sponge released 68.5% of the carboplatin. Peak release of carboplatin from the calcium sulfate beads was not reached within 96 hours.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In this study, carboplatin release from the hemostatic gelatin sponge was incomplete. The poloxamer copolymer gel and hemostatic gelatin sponge released carboplatin rapidly in vitro, whereas calcium sulfate beads did not.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Risselada (marije_risselada@ncsu.edu).