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Pharmacokinetics of zonisamide following rectal administration to healthy dogs

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  • 1 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996.
  • | 2 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996.
  • | 3 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996.
  • | 4 Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849.
  • | 5 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the pharmacokinetics of zonisamide following rectal administration of 20 or 30 mg/kg suspended in sterile water or polyethylene glycol (PEG) to healthy dogs and determine whether either dose resulted in plasma zonisamide concentrations within the recommended therapeutic target range (10 to 40 μg/mL).

ANIMALS 8 healthy mixed-breed dogs.

PROCEDURES Each dog received each of 2 doses (20 or 30 mg/kg) of zonisamide suspended in each of 2 delivery substrates (sterile water or PEG) in a randomized crossover study with a 7-day washout period between phases. A blood sample was collected from each dog immediately before and at predetermined times for 48 hours after zonisamide administration. Plasma zonisamide concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography, and data were analyzed with a noncompartmental model.

RESULTS Mean maximum plasma concentration, time to maximum plasma concentration, mean residence time, and elimination half-life did not differ significantly among the 4 treatments. The mean maximum plasma concentration for all 4 treatments was less than the therapeutic target range. The mean ± SD area under the concentration-time curve for the 30 mg/kg-in-water treatment (391.94 ± 237.00 h•μg/mL) was significantly greater than that for the 20 mg/kg-in-water (146.19 ± 66.27 h•μg/mL) and 20 mg/kg-in-PEG (87.09 ± 96.87 h•μg/mL) treatments.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that rectal administration of zonisamide at doses of 20 and 30 mg/kg failed to achieve plasma zonisamide concentrations within the recommended therapeutic target range. Therefore, rectal administration of zonisamide cannot be recommended as a suitable alternative to oral administration.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Williams' present address is Carolina Veterinary Specialists, 1600 Hanes Mall Blvd, Winston-Salem, NC 27103.

Address correspondence to Dr. Michaels (jmichal2@utk.edu).