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Comparison of antibacterial effects among three foams used with negative pressure wound therapy in an ex vivo equine perfused wound model

Lore L. Van Hecke MMedVet1, Maarten Haspeslagh MMedVet2, Katleen Hermans DVM, PhD3, and Ann M. Martens DVM, PhD4
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  • 1 Department of Surgery and Anaesthesiology of Domestic Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Merelbeke 9820, Belgium.
  • | 2 Department of Surgery and Anaesthesiology of Domestic Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Merelbeke 9820, Belgium.
  • | 3 Department of Pathology, Bacteriology and Poultry Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Merelbeke 9820, Belgium.
  • | 4 Department of Surgery and Anaesthesiology of Domestic Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Merelbeke 9820, Belgium.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To compare antibacterial effects among 3 types of foam used with negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in an ex vivo equine perfused wound model.

SAMPLES Abdominal musculocutaneous flaps from 6 equine cadavers.

PROCEDURES Each musculocutaneous flap was continuously perfused with saline (0.9% NaCl) solution. Four 5-cm circular wounds were created in each flap and contaminated with 106 CFUs of both Pseudomonas aeruginosa and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). After a 1-hour incubation period, 1 of 4 treatments (NPWT with silver-impregnated polyurethane foam [NPWT-AgPU], polyurethane foam [NPWT-PU], or polyvinyl alcohol foam [NPWT-PVA] or a nonadherent dressing containing polyhexamethylene biguanide without NPWT [control]) was randomly applied to each wound. An 8-mm punch biopsy specimen was obtained from each wound immediately before and at 6, 12, 18, and 24 hours after treatment application to determine the bacterial load for both P aeruginosa and MRSA.

RESULTS The bacterial load of P aeruginosa for the NPWT-PVA treatment was significantly lower than that for the other 3 treatments at each sampling time after application, whereas the bacterial load for the NPWT-AgPU treatment was significantly lower than that for the NPWT-PU and control treatments at 12 hours after application. The bacterial load of MRSA for the NPWT-PVA treatment was significantly lower than that for the other 3 treatments at each sampling time after application.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that wounds treated with NPWT-PVA had the greatest decrease in bacterial load; however, the effect of that treatment on wound healing needs to be assessed in vivo.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Van Hecke (lore.vanhecke@ugent.be).