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Effects of dobutamine hydrochloride on cardiovascular function in horses anesthetized with isoflurane with or without acepromazine maleate premedication

Mara F. Schier BVMs1, Anthea L. Raisis BVSc, PhD2, Cristy J. Secombe BVMs, MVSc3, Giselle Hosgood BVSc, PhD4, Gabrielle C. Musk BVMs, PhD5, and Guy D. Lester DVM, PhD6
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  • 1 College of Veterinary Medicine, School of Veterinary and Life Sciences, Murdoch University, Murdoch, WA 6150, Australia.
  • | 2 College of Veterinary Medicine, School of Veterinary and Life Sciences, Murdoch University, Murdoch, WA 6150, Australia.
  • | 3 College of Veterinary Medicine, School of Veterinary and Life Sciences, Murdoch University, Murdoch, WA 6150, Australia.
  • | 4 College of Veterinary Medicine, School of Veterinary and Life Sciences, Murdoch University, Murdoch, WA 6150, Australia.
  • | 5 College of Veterinary Medicine, School of Veterinary and Life Sciences, Murdoch University, Murdoch, WA 6150, Australia.
  • | 6 College of Veterinary Medicine, School of Veterinary and Life Sciences, Murdoch University, Murdoch, WA 6150, Australia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the effects of acepromazine maleate premedication on cardiovascular function before and after infusion of dobutamine hydrochloride for 30 minutes in isoflurane-anesthetized horses.

ANIMALS 6 healthy adult horses.

PROCEDURES Each horse was anesthetized once following premedication with acepromazine (0.02 mg/kg, IV) administered 30 minutes prior to anesthetic induction (ACP+ treatment) and once without premedication (ACP– treatment). Anesthesia was induced with IV administration of xylazine hydrochloride (0.8 mg/kg), ketamine hydrochloride (2.2 mg/kg), and diazepam (0.08 mg/kg). Horses were positioned in right lateral recumbency, and anesthesia was maintained via inhalation of isoflurane delivered in oxygen. End-tidal isoflurane concentration was adjusted to achieve a target mean arterial blood pressure of 60 mm Hg (interquartile range [25th to 75th percentile], 57 to 63 mm Hg) for at least 15 minutes. Cardiac index, oxygen delivery index, and femoral arterial blood flow indices were determined 60 minutes after anesthetic induction (baseline). Dobutamine was then infused to achieve a target mean arterial blood pressure of 80 mm Hg (interquartile range, 76 to 80 mm Hg). Data collection was repeated 30 minutes after the start of dobutamine infusion for comparison with baseline values.

RESULTS Complete data sets were available from 5 of the 6 horses. Dobutamine administration resulted in significant increases in oxygen delivery and femoral arterial blood flow indices but no significant change in cardiac index for each treatment. However, at baseline or 30 minutes after the start of dobutamine infusion, findings for the ACP+ and ACP– treatments did not differ.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In isoflurane-anesthetized horses, dobutamine administration increased oxygen delivery and femoral arterial blood flow indices, but these changes were unaffected by premedication with acepromazine.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Schier (m.schier@murdoch.edu.au).