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Dynamic computed tomographic determination of scan delay for use in performing cardiac angiography in clinically normal dogs

Jisun Kim DVM1, Yeonho Bae DVM2, Gahyun Lee DVM3, Sunghoon Jeon DVM4, and Jihye Choi DVM, PhD5
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  • 1 College of Veterinary Medicine, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757, Republic of Korea.
  • | 2 College of Veterinary Medicine, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757, Republic of Korea.
  • | 3 College of Veterinary Medicine, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757, Republic of Korea.
  • | 4 College of Veterinary Medicine, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757, Republic of Korea.
  • | 5 College of Veterinary Medicine, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the scan delay for use in performing cardiac CT angiography in dogs.

ANIMALS 4 clinically normal adult Beagles.

PROCEDURES In a crossover study, 12 formulations of iohexol solutions differing in iodine dose (300, 400, and 800 mg/kg) and concentration (undiluted and diluted 1:1, 1:2, and 1:3 with saline [0.9% NaCl] solution) were administered IV to each dog. Dynamic CT angiography was performed to evaluate enhancement characteristics of each formulation, with the region of interest set over the aorta. Time-attenuation curves (TACs) were obtained and analyzed.

RESULTS Peak arc–type TACs were obtained after administration of all undiluted formulations. Curve shape changed from peak arc type to plateau type as the total volume of the contrast solution (ie, dilution) increased. Prolonged peaks characteristic of plateau-type TACs suggested that a sufficient period of homogeneous attenuation could be achieved for CT scanning with administration of higher iohexol dilutions (1:2 or 1:3) containing higher iodine doses (400 or 800 mg/kg). In particular, attenuation values for plateau-type TACs remained between 200 and 300 Hounsfield units for > 16 seconds after the plateau endpoint was reached for 1:2 and 1:3 dilutions containing an iodine dose of 800 mg/kg. Scan delays of 13 to 17 seconds were computed for those 2 formulations.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that for clinically normal dogs, a scan delay of 13 to 17 seconds could be used to perform cardiac CT angiography with iohexol solutions containing an iodine dose of 800 mg/kg at dilutions of 1:2 or 1:3.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Choi (imsono@chonnam.ac.kr).