Use of indocyanine green and sodium fluorescein for anterior segment angiography in ophthalmologically normal cats

Chris G. Pirie Department of Clinical Sciences, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536.

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Anthony Alario Department of Clinical Sciences, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536.

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE To assess and compare results of anterior segment angiography of ophthalmologically normal cats following IV injection with indocyanine green and sodium fluorescein dyes.

ANIMALS 10 client-owned cats.

PROCEDURES Anterior segment angiography was performed in anesthetized cats following administration of 0.25% indocyanine green (1.0 mg/kg, IV) or 10% sodium fluorescein (20 mg/kg, IV) solution. All cats received both treatments. Imaging (1 eye/cat) was performed with a full-spectrum digital single-lens reflex camera equipped with an adaptor (1 image/s for 30 seconds) immediately following IV dye injection and 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 minutes after injection. Onset and duration of arterial, capillary, and venous phases of iris vasculature were identified and compared statistically between treatments. Degree of iridal pigmentation, leakage of dye from iris vasculature, and image quality were subjectively assessed.

RESULTS No differences were found in onset or duration of vascular phases between treatments. Visibility of the iris vasculature was not impaired by poor or moderate iridal pigmentation with either method. Indocyanine green provided subjectively better vascular detail and image contrast than sodium fluorescein. No vascular dye leakage was observed following indocyanine green administration. Leakage of dye from blood vessels in the stroma (in 10 cats) and presence of dye in the anterior chamber (in 5 cats) were detected after sodium fluorescein administration.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Images obtained with either fluorescent dye were considered to be of diagnostic quality. Lack of leakage following indocyanine green administration suggested this treatment may have better diagnostic utility for anterior segment angiography. The photographic equipment used provided a cost-effective alternative to existing imaging systems.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To assess and compare results of anterior segment angiography of ophthalmologically normal cats following IV injection with indocyanine green and sodium fluorescein dyes.

ANIMALS 10 client-owned cats.

PROCEDURES Anterior segment angiography was performed in anesthetized cats following administration of 0.25% indocyanine green (1.0 mg/kg, IV) or 10% sodium fluorescein (20 mg/kg, IV) solution. All cats received both treatments. Imaging (1 eye/cat) was performed with a full-spectrum digital single-lens reflex camera equipped with an adaptor (1 image/s for 30 seconds) immediately following IV dye injection and 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 minutes after injection. Onset and duration of arterial, capillary, and venous phases of iris vasculature were identified and compared statistically between treatments. Degree of iridal pigmentation, leakage of dye from iris vasculature, and image quality were subjectively assessed.

RESULTS No differences were found in onset or duration of vascular phases between treatments. Visibility of the iris vasculature was not impaired by poor or moderate iridal pigmentation with either method. Indocyanine green provided subjectively better vascular detail and image contrast than sodium fluorescein. No vascular dye leakage was observed following indocyanine green administration. Leakage of dye from blood vessels in the stroma (in 10 cats) and presence of dye in the anterior chamber (in 5 cats) were detected after sodium fluorescein administration.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Images obtained with either fluorescent dye were considered to be of diagnostic quality. Lack of leakage following indocyanine green administration suggested this treatment may have better diagnostic utility for anterior segment angiography. The photographic equipment used provided a cost-effective alternative to existing imaging systems.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Alario's present address is Capital Area Veterinary Emergency Service, 1 Intervale Rd, Concord, NH 03301.

Address correspondence to Dr. Pirie (chris.pirie@tufts.edu).
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