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Differentiation of canine adipose tissue–derived mesenchymal stem cells towards endothelial progenitor cells

Byung-Jae Kang DVM, PhD1,2, Seung Hoon Lee DVM3, Oh-Kyeong Kweon DVM, PhD4, and Je-Yoel Cho DVM, PhD5
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  • 1 Departments of Veterinary Biochemistry, BK21Plus Program and Research Institute for Veterinary Science, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, Republic of Korea.
  • | 2 Veterinary Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, Republic of Korea.
  • | 3 Veterinary Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, Republic of Korea.
  • | 4 Veterinary Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, Republic of Korea.
  • | 5 Departments of Veterinary Biochemistry, BK21Plus Program and Research Institute for Veterinary Science, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

Objective—To determine the differentiation of canine adipose tissue–derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) into endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs).

Animals—3 healthy adult Beagles.

Procedures—Canine ASCs were isolated and cultured from adipose tissue, and endothelial differentiation was induced by culturing ASCs in differentiation medium. Morphological and immunophenotypic changes were monitored. Expression of endothelial-specific markers was analyzed by conventional and real-time RT-PCR assay. The in vitro and in vivo functional characteristics of the endothelial-like cells induced from canine ASCs were evaluated by use of an in vitro solubilized basement membrane tube assay, low-density lipoprotein uptake assay, and in vivo solubilized basement membrane plug assay.

Results—After differentiation culture, the cells developed morphological changes, expressed EPC markers such as CD34 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, and revealed functional characteristics in vitro. Furthermore, the induced cells allowed vessel formation in solubilized basement membrane plugs in vivo.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that canine ASCs developed EPC characteristics when stimulated by differentiation medium with growth factors. Thus, differentiated canine ASC-EPCs may have the potential to provide vascularization for constructs used in regenerative medicine strategies.

Contributor Notes

Supported by the National Research Foundation (NRF), Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning (2012M3A9C6049716 and 20110019355).

The authors thank Dr. Hyung-Sik Kim for technical assistance with fluorescent-activated cell sorting.

Address correspondence to Dr. Cho (jeycho@snu.ac.kr).