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Effects of tylosin administration on C-reactive protein concentration and carriage of Salmonella enterica in pigs

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  • 1 Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Science, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, MN 55108.
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Science, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, MN 55108.
  • | 3 Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Science, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, MN 55108.
  • | 4 Department of Animal Sciences, College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801.
  • | 5 Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Science, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, MN 55108.
  • | 6 Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Science, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, MN 55108.
  • | 7 Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Science, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, MN 55108.
  • | 8 Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Science, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, MN 55108.

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effects of tylosin on C-reactive protein concentration, carriage of Salmonella enterica, and antimicrobial resistance genes in commercial pigs.

Animals—120 pigs on 2 commercial farms.

Procedures—A cohort of sixty 10-week-old pigs in 4 pens/farm (15 pigs/pen) was randomly selected. Equal numbers of pigs were given feed containing tylosin (40 μg/g of feed) for 0, 6, or 12 weeks. C-reactive protein concentrations were measured, microbial culture for S enterica in feces was performed, and antimicrobial resistance genes in feces were quantified.

Results—No significant associations were detected between C-reactive protein concentration or S enterica status and tylosin treatment. During the 12 weeks of tylosin administration, increased levels of 6 antimicrobial resistance genes did not occur.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Treatment of pigs with tylosin did not affect C-reactive protein concentration or reduce carriage or load of S enterica. There was no evidence that pigs receiving tylosin had increased carriage of the 6 antimicrobial resistance genes measured.

Impact for Human MedicineS enterica is a public health concern. Use of the antimicrobial growth promoter tylosin did not pose a public health risk by means of increased carriage of S enterica.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Kim's present address is the Department of Animal Resources Science Dankook University Dandaero119, Chenan 330-714, South Korea.

This manuscript represents a portion of a thesis submitted by Dr. Kim to the University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine as partial fulfillment of the requirements for the PhD degree.

Supported by USDA/NRI grant No. 2007-35212-18046 and Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship granted to Dr. Kim by the University of Minnesota.

Presented in abstract form at the 92nd Annual Conference of Research Workers in Animal Diseases, Chicago, December 2011.

Address correspondence to Dr. Isaacson (isaac015@umn.edu).