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Microcirculatory effects of a hyperviscous hemoglobin-based solution administered intravenously in dogs with experimentally induced hemorrhagic shock

Ann M. Peruski DVM, MS1, Edward S. Cooper VMD, MS2, and Amy L. Butler DVM, MS3
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  • 1 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, 43210.
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, 43210.
  • | 3 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, 43210.

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether increasing the viscosity of a standard hemoglobin-based oxygen-carrying solution (HBOC) would offset its associated vasoconstrictive effects and result in improved microvascular perfusion in healthy splenectomized dogs with experimentally induced hemorrhagic shock.

Animals—12 male American Foxhounds.

Procedures—Each dog underwent anesthesia and splenectomy. Shock was induced by controlled hemorrhage until a mean arterial blood pressure of 40 mm Hg was achieved and maintained for 60 minutes. Dogs were then randomly assigned to receive either a standard or hyperviscous HBOC (6 dogs/group). Sidestream dark-field microscopy was used to assess the effects of shock and HBOC administration on the microcirculation of the buccal mucosa and the jejunal serosa. Video recordings of the microcirculation were collected before shock was induced (baseline) and at intervals up to 180 minutes following HBOC administration. Vascular analysis software was used to compute microcirculatory variables.

Results—Compared with baseline findings, hemorrhagic shock resulted in decreases in all microvascular variables in the buccal mucosa and the jejunal serosa. At all time points following HBOC administration, microvascular variables were similar to initial values and no significant differences between treatment groups were detected. At all time points following HBOC administration, blood and plasma viscosities in dogs treated with the hyperviscous solution were significantly higher than values in dogs receiving the standard solution.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In splenectomized dogs with experimentally induced hemorrhagic shock, administration of a hyperviscous HBOC did not significantly affect microvascular variables, compared with effects of a standard HBOC. Microcirculatory flow returned to baseline values in both treatment groups, suggesting that marked HBOC-associated vasoconstriction did not occur.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Peruski's present address is Cincinnati Animal Referral and Emergency Center, 6995 E Kemper Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45249.

Dr. Butler's present address is Veterinary Emergency and Referral Center, 318 Northern Blvd, Clarks Summit, PA 18411.

Supported by an intramural grant of The Ohio State University. Biiopure Corp donated the hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine) preparation used in the study.

Presented in abstract form at the 15th Annual International Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Symposium, Chicago, September 2009.

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Address correspondence to Dr. Peruski (aperuski@carecentervets.com).