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Effects of oxygen insufflation rate, respiratory rate, and tidal volume on fraction of inspired oxygen in cadaveric canine heads attached to a lung model

Melina E. ZimmermanDepartment of Clinical Sciences, Kansas State University Veterinary Health Center, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.

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David S. HodgsonDepartment of Clinical Sciences, Kansas State University Veterinary Health Center, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.

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Nora M. BelloDepartment of Statistics, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506.

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Abstract

Objective—To assess the effects of oxygen insufflation rate, respiratory rate, and tidal volume on fraction of inspired oxygen (Fio2) in cadaveric canine heads attached to a lung model.

Sample—16 heads of canine cadavers.

Procedures—Each cadaver head was instrumented with a nasal insufflation catheter through which oxygen was delivered. The trachea was attached to a sample collection port connected by means of corrugated tubing to a lung model. Eight treatment combinations that varied in respiratory rate (10 or 20 breaths/min), tidal volume (10 or 15 mL/kg), and oxygen insufflation rate (50 or 100 mL/kg/min) were applied to each head in a replicated Latin square design. Gas samples were manually collected, and inspired oxygen concentrations were analyzed. The Fio2 and end-tidal CO2 concentration were determined and compared among sample groups.

Results—Estimated least squares mean Fio2 for various treatment combinations ranged from 32.2% to 60.6%. The Fio2 was significantly increased at the higher insufflation rate (estimated marginal least squares mean, 48.7% vs 38.6% for 100 and 50 mL/kg/min, respectively), lower respiratory rate (48.9% vs 38.3% for 10 and 20 breaths/min, respectively), and smaller tidal volume (46.8% vs 40.0% for 10 and 15 mL/kg, respectively).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Fio2 in the model was affected by oxygen insufflation rate, respiratory rate, and tidal volume. This information may potentially help clinicians interpret results of blood gas analysis and manage canine patients receiving oxygen insufflation via a nasal catheter.

Abstract

Objective—To assess the effects of oxygen insufflation rate, respiratory rate, and tidal volume on fraction of inspired oxygen (Fio2) in cadaveric canine heads attached to a lung model.

Sample—16 heads of canine cadavers.

Procedures—Each cadaver head was instrumented with a nasal insufflation catheter through which oxygen was delivered. The trachea was attached to a sample collection port connected by means of corrugated tubing to a lung model. Eight treatment combinations that varied in respiratory rate (10 or 20 breaths/min), tidal volume (10 or 15 mL/kg), and oxygen insufflation rate (50 or 100 mL/kg/min) were applied to each head in a replicated Latin square design. Gas samples were manually collected, and inspired oxygen concentrations were analyzed. The Fio2 and end-tidal CO2 concentration were determined and compared among sample groups.

Results—Estimated least squares mean Fio2 for various treatment combinations ranged from 32.2% to 60.6%. The Fio2 was significantly increased at the higher insufflation rate (estimated marginal least squares mean, 48.7% vs 38.6% for 100 and 50 mL/kg/min, respectively), lower respiratory rate (48.9% vs 38.3% for 10 and 20 breaths/min, respectively), and smaller tidal volume (46.8% vs 40.0% for 10 and 15 mL/kg, respectively).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Fio2 in the model was affected by oxygen insufflation rate, respiratory rate, and tidal volume. This information may potentially help clinicians interpret results of blood gas analysis and manage canine patients receiving oxygen insufflation via a nasal catheter.

Contributor Notes

Supported in part by Kansas State University Department of Clinical Sciences.

Address correspondence to Dr. Zimmerman (mezdvm@vet.k-state.edu).