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Distribution of 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-d-glucose in the coelom of healthy bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus)

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  • 1 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996.
  • | 2 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996.
  • | 3 Molecular Imaging and Translational Research Program, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996.
  • | 4 Molecular Imaging and Translational Research Program, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996.
  • | 5 Molecular Imaging and Translational Research Program, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996.
  • | 6 Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996.
  • | 7 Molecular Imaging and Translational Research Program, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996.

Abstract

Objective—To determine 2-deoxy-2-fluoro (fluorine 18)-d-glucose (18FDG) biodistribution in the coelom of bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus).

Animals—8 healthy adult bald eagles.

Procedures—For each eagle, whole-body transmission noncontrast CT, 60-minute dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) of the celomic cavity (immediately after 18FDG injection), whole-body static PET 60 minutes after 18FDG injection, and whole-body contrast CT with iohexol were performed. After reconstruction, images were analyzed. Regions of interest were drawn over the ventricular myocardium, liver, spleen, proventriculus, cloaca, kidneys, and lungs on dynamic and static PET images. Standardized uptake values were calculated.

Results—Kidneys had the most intense 18FDG uptake, followed by cloaca and intestinal tract; liver activity was mild and slightly more intense than that of the spleen; proventricular activity was always present, whereas little to no activity was identified in the wall of the ventriculus. Activity in the myocardium was present in all birds but varied in intensity among birds. The lungs had no visibly discernible activity. Mean ± SD standardized uptake values calculated with representative regions of interest at 60 minutes were as follows: myocardium, 1. 6 ± 0.2 (transverse plane) and 1.3 ± 0.3 (sagittal plane); liver, 1.1 ± 0.1; spleen, 0.9 ± 0.1; proventriculus, 1.0 ± 0.1; cloaca, 4.4 ± 2.7; right kidney, 17.3 ± 1.0; left kidney, 17.6 ± 0.3; and right and left lungs (each), 0.3 ± 0.02.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The study established the biodistribution of 18FDG in adult eagles, providing a baseline for clinical investigation and future research.

Abstract

Objective—To determine 2-deoxy-2-fluoro (fluorine 18)-d-glucose (18FDG) biodistribution in the coelom of bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus).

Animals—8 healthy adult bald eagles.

Procedures—For each eagle, whole-body transmission noncontrast CT, 60-minute dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) of the celomic cavity (immediately after 18FDG injection), whole-body static PET 60 minutes after 18FDG injection, and whole-body contrast CT with iohexol were performed. After reconstruction, images were analyzed. Regions of interest were drawn over the ventricular myocardium, liver, spleen, proventriculus, cloaca, kidneys, and lungs on dynamic and static PET images. Standardized uptake values were calculated.

Results—Kidneys had the most intense 18FDG uptake, followed by cloaca and intestinal tract; liver activity was mild and slightly more intense than that of the spleen; proventricular activity was always present, whereas little to no activity was identified in the wall of the ventriculus. Activity in the myocardium was present in all birds but varied in intensity among birds. The lungs had no visibly discernible activity. Mean ± SD standardized uptake values calculated with representative regions of interest at 60 minutes were as follows: myocardium, 1. 6 ± 0.2 (transverse plane) and 1.3 ± 0.3 (sagittal plane); liver, 1.1 ± 0.1; spleen, 0.9 ± 0.1; proventriculus, 1.0 ± 0.1; cloaca, 4.4 ± 2.7; right kidney, 17.3 ± 1.0; left kidney, 17.6 ± 0.3; and right and left lungs (each), 0.3 ± 0.02.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The study established the biodistribution of 18FDG in adult eagles, providing a baseline for clinical investigation and future research.

Contributor Notes

Ms. Long's present address is PETNET Solutions Inc, 810 Innovation Dr, Knoxville, TN 37932.

Presented in part at the 32nd Annual Conference of the Association of Avian Veterinarians, Seattle, August 2011; and the American College of Veterinary Radiology Annual Scientific Meeting, Albuquerque, October 2011.

The authors thank The American Eagle Foundation for providing eagles for this study.

Address correspondence to Dr. Jones (mpjones@utk.edu).