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Expression of proteins in serum, synovial fluid, synovial membrane, and articular cartilage samples obtained from dogs with stifle joint osteoarthritis secondary to cranial cruciate ligament disease and dogs without stifle joint arthritis

Bridget C. Garner DVM, PhD1, Keiichi Kuroki DVM, PhD2, Aaron M. Stoker PhD3, Cristi R. Cook DVM, MS4, and James L. Cook DVM, PhD5
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  • 1 Comparative Orthopaedic Laboratory, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 2 Comparative Orthopaedic Laboratory, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 3 Comparative Orthopaedic Laboratory, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 4 Comparative Orthopaedic Laboratory, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.
  • | 5 Comparative Orthopaedic Laboratory, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211.

Abstract

Objective—To identify proteins with differential expression between healthy dogs and dogs with stifle joint osteoarthritis secondary to cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) disease.

Sample—Serum and synovial fluid samples obtained from dogs with stifle joint osteoarthritis before (n = 10) and after (8) surgery and control dogs without osteoarthritis (9) and archived synovial membrane and articular cartilage samples obtained from dogs with stifle joint osteoarthritis (5) and dogs without arthritis (5).

Procedures—Serum and synovial fluid samples were analyzed via liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry; results were compared against a nonredundant protein database. Expression of complement component 3 in archived tissue samples was determined via immunohistochemical methods.

Results—No proteins had significantly different expression between serum samples of control dogs versus those of dogs with stifle joint osteoarthritis. Eleven proteins (complement component 3 precursor, complement factor I precursor, apolipoprotein B-100 precursor, serum paraoxonase and arylesterase 1, zinc-alpha-2-glycoprotein precursor, serum amyloid A, transthyretin precursor, retinol-binding protein 4 precursor, alpha-2-macroglobulin precursor, angiotensinogen precursor, and fibronectin 1 isoform 1 preproprotein) had significantly different expression (> 2.0-fold) between synovial fluid samples obtained before surgery from dogs with stifle joint osteoarthritis versus those obtained from control dogs. Complement component 3 was strongly expressed in all (5/5) synovial membrane samples of dogs with stifle joint osteoarthritis and weakly expressed in 3 of 5 synovial membrane samples of dogs without stifle joint arthritis.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Findings suggested that the complement system and proteins involved in lipid and cholesterol metabolism may have a role in stifle joint osteoarthritis, CCL disease, or both.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Garner's present address is Department of Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

Funded by the University of Missouri Research Board Grant.

The authors thank Dr. Brian Mooney for assistance with proteomic analysis.

Address correspondence to Dr. Kuroki (kurokik@missouri.edu).