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Intracranial pressure and cardiopulmonary variables during isoflurane or sevoflurane anesthesia at various minimum alveolar concentration multiples in normocapnic dogs

Amandeep S. Chohan BVSc & AH, MS1, Stephen A. Greene DVM, MS2, Robert D. Keegan DVM3, Tamara L. Grubb DVM, MS4, and Annie V. Chen DVM, MS5
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  • 1 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164.
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164.
  • | 3 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164.
  • | 4 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164.
  • | 5 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164.

Abstract

Objective—To compare effects of isoflurane and sevoflurane on intracranial pressure and cardiovascular variables at 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 times the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) in mechanically ventilated normocapnic dogs.

Animals—6 healthy male Beagles.

Procedures—The individual MAC was determined for each agent with an electrical stimulus. After a minimum of 1 week, anesthetic induction by use of a mask with one of the inhalation anesthetics selected randomly was followed by mechanical ventilation and instrumentation for measurement of intracranial pressure and cardiovascular variables. Heart rate; systolic, mean, and diastolic arterial blood pressures; central venous pressure; mean pulmonary arterial pressure; pulmonary artery occlusion pressure; cardiac output; intracranial pressure (ICP); core body temperature; end-tidal inhalation anesthetic and carbon dioxide concentration; and arterial blood gas values were measured after attaining equilibrium at 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 MAC of each inhalation anesthetic. Cardiac index, systemic vascular resistance, pulmonary vascular resistance, and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) were calculated.

Results—Mean ICP did not differ within and between anesthetics at any MAC. Compared with equipotent concentrations of isoflurane, the CPP and mean values for systolic, mean, and diastolic arterial blood pressures were increased at 2.0 MAC for sevoflurane, whereas mean values for mean and diastolic arterial blood pressures and systemic vascular resistance were increased at 1.5 MAC for sevoflurane.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Although ICP was similar in healthy normocapnic dogs, CPP was better maintained during 2.0 MAC for sevoflurane, compared with isoflurane.

Contributor Notes

Supported by Abbott Laboratories.

Presented in abstract form at the American College of Veterinary Anesthesiologists Annual Meeting held in conjunction with the 17th International Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Symposium, Nashville, Tenn, September 2011.

Address correspondence to Dr. Chohan (chohan@vetmed.wsu.edu).