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Assessment of circulating concentrations of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide in dogs with brachycephalic airway obstruction syndrome

Lisa RancanDepartment of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Medicine, Complutense University of Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain.

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Stefano RomussiDepartment of Clinical Veterinary Science, Faculty of Veterinary, University of Milan, 20122 Milan, Italy.

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Paloma GarciaDepartment of Medicine and Surgery, Veterinary Faculty, Complutense University of Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain.

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Mariangela AlbertiniDepartment of Animal Pathology, Faculty of Veterinary, University of Milan, 20122 Milan, Italy.

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Elena VaraDepartment of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Medicine, Complutense University of Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain.

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Mercedes Sánchez de la MuelaDepartment of Medicine and Surgery, Veterinary Faculty, Complutense University of Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain.

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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate plasma concentrations of inflammatory mediators in dogs with brachycephalic airway obstruction syndrome, identify a possible role for these mediators in the syndrome, and investigate the relationship between plasma concentrations of inflammatory mediators and severity of clinical signs.

Animals—17 dogs with brachycephalic airway obstruction syndrome and 10 mesocephalic (control) dogs.

Procedures—A blood sample was collected once from each dog. Plasma concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-6, IL-17A, IL-10, and IL-13 were measured with ELISAs. Nitric oxide (NO) concentrations were determined with a Griess test. For analysis, brachycephalic dogs were categorized into groups depending on weight (smal [< 16 kg]) and large [≥ 16 kg]) or on whether they required medical or surgical treatment.

Results—Compared with control dog values, plasma concentrations of TNF-α, IL-10, IL-13, and IL-17A were significantly higher in brachycephalic dogs and markedly so for brachycephalic dogs that required surgery; findings for small and large brachycephalic dogs did not differ. A similar pattern of differences between control and brachycephalic dogs was dentified for plasma NO concentration. Plasma IL-1β and IL-6 concentrations in control and brachycephalic dogs did not differ.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In brachycephalic dogs, plasma TNF-α, IL-10, IL-13, L-17A, and NO concentrations were higher than values in control dogs and appeared to be associated with disease severity. These variables may be useful as indicators of inflammatory processes associated with brachycephalic airway obstruction syndrome in dogs.

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate plasma concentrations of inflammatory mediators in dogs with brachycephalic airway obstruction syndrome, identify a possible role for these mediators in the syndrome, and investigate the relationship between plasma concentrations of inflammatory mediators and severity of clinical signs.

Animals—17 dogs with brachycephalic airway obstruction syndrome and 10 mesocephalic (control) dogs.

Procedures—A blood sample was collected once from each dog. Plasma concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-6, IL-17A, IL-10, and IL-13 were measured with ELISAs. Nitric oxide (NO) concentrations were determined with a Griess test. For analysis, brachycephalic dogs were categorized into groups depending on weight (smal [< 16 kg]) and large [≥ 16 kg]) or on whether they required medical or surgical treatment.

Results—Compared with control dog values, plasma concentrations of TNF-α, IL-10, IL-13, and IL-17A were significantly higher in brachycephalic dogs and markedly so for brachycephalic dogs that required surgery; findings for small and large brachycephalic dogs did not differ. A similar pattern of differences between control and brachycephalic dogs was dentified for plasma NO concentration. Plasma IL-1β and IL-6 concentrations in control and brachycephalic dogs did not differ.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In brachycephalic dogs, plasma TNF-α, IL-10, IL-13, L-17A, and NO concentrations were higher than values in control dogs and appeared to be associated with disease severity. These variables may be useful as indicators of inflammatory processes associated with brachycephalic airway obstruction syndrome in dogs.

Contributor Notes

Presented in an abstract form at the 20th Annual Scientific Meeting of the European College of Veterinary Surgeons, Ghent, Belgium, July 2011.

Address correspondence to Dr. Rancan (lisa_rancan@hotmail.com).