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Effect of parenteral l-alanyl-l-glutamine administration on phagocytic responses of polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocytes in dogs undergoing high-dose methylprednisolone sodium succinate treatment

Ji-Houn Kang DVM, PhD1, Sung-Soo Kim DVM, MS2, and Mhan-Pyo Yang DVM, PhD3
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  • 1 Laboratory of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Department of Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Chungbuk 361–763, Republic of Korea.
  • | 2 Laboratory of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Department of Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Chungbuk 361–763, Republic of Korea.
  • | 3 Laboratory of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Department of Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Chungbuk 361–763, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether parenteral l-alanyl-l-glutamine (Ala-Gln) administration modulated phagocytic responses of polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocytes (PMNs) from dogs undergoing high-dose methylprednisolone sodium succinate (MPSS) treatment.

Animals—15 healthy Beagles.

Procedures—Dogs were randomly assigned to 3 treatment groups (n = 5/group): 38-hour IV infusion of saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (control group), saline solution with 8.5% amino acids (2.3 g/kg/d), or saline solution with 8.5% amino acids (1.8 g/kg/d) and 20% l-alanyl-l-glutamine (Ala-Gln; 0.5 g/kg/d). High-dose MPSS treatment was initiated at the same time that IV infusions began, such that a total dose of 85 mg of MPSS/kg was administered through multiple IV injections over a 26-hour period. The infusions were maintained until 12 hours after the last MPSS injection. Blood samples collected before MPSS injections began and 2, 12, and 24 hours after injections ceased were used to evaluate PMN function.

Results—MPSS injections resulted in an increase in the total number of circulating leukocytes and increases in neutrophil and monocyte counts but did not affect lymphocyte, eosinophil, or basophil counts. Lymphocyte counts in the Ala-Gln group were higher than in the control group 12 hours after MPSS injections finished. Relative to preinfusion values, phagocytic capacity, oxidative burst activity, and filamentous actin polymerization of PMNs were suppressed in all dogs except those that received Ala-Gln.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Parenteral Ala-Gln administration in dogs resulted in an increase in PMN phagocytic responses that were suppressed by high-dose MPSS treatment.

Contributor Notes

Presented in abstract form at the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine Forum and Canadian Veterinary Medical Association Convention, Montreal, June 2009.

Address correspondence to Dr. Yang (mpyang@chungbuk.ac.kr).