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Comparison of the efficacy and adverse effects of sustained-release buprenorphine hydrochloride following subcutaneous administration and buprenorphine hydrochloride following oral transmucosal administration in cats undergoing ovariohysterectomy

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  • 1 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.
  • | 2 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.
  • | 3 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.
  • | 4 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.
  • | 5 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523.

Abstract

Objective—To compare the efficacy and adverse effects of sustained-release (SR) buprenorphine following SC administration and buprenorphine following oral transmucosal (OTM) administration in cats undergoing ovariohysterectomy.

Animals—21 young healthy female cats.

Procedures—As part of anesthetic premedication (0 hours), 10 cats received buprenorphine (0.02 mg/kg) via OTM administration with additional doses at 12, 24, 36, 48, and 60 hours and 11 cats received an equivalent total dose as a single SC injection of SR buprenorphine (0.12 mg/kg). The SR product contained buprenorphine hydrochloride in a proprietary SR matrix. All other anesthetic drugs and a single postoperative dose of meloxicam were administered similarly to all cats. Behavioral and physiologic variables were recorded, and signs of pain were assessed by use of 2 pain assessment scales and von Frey filament testing in each cat prior to premedication administration (baseline), during recovery from anesthesia (RFA), and at 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, and 72 hours.

Results—Heart rate increased and temperature (determined via microchip transponder thermometry) decreased from baseline values during RFA in both groups. Compared with baseline values, pain scores were increased during RFA and at the 12- and 24-hour time points in both groups; von Frey scores were higher during RFA. Behavioral and physiologic variables did not differ significantly between groups at any time point.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In cats undergoing ovariohysterectomy, SC administration of a preoperative dose of SR buprenorphine appeared to have comparable efficacy and adverse effect profile as that of twice-daily OTM administration of buprenorphine before and after surgery.

Abstract

Objective—To compare the efficacy and adverse effects of sustained-release (SR) buprenorphine following SC administration and buprenorphine following oral transmucosal (OTM) administration in cats undergoing ovariohysterectomy.

Animals—21 young healthy female cats.

Procedures—As part of anesthetic premedication (0 hours), 10 cats received buprenorphine (0.02 mg/kg) via OTM administration with additional doses at 12, 24, 36, 48, and 60 hours and 11 cats received an equivalent total dose as a single SC injection of SR buprenorphine (0.12 mg/kg). The SR product contained buprenorphine hydrochloride in a proprietary SR matrix. All other anesthetic drugs and a single postoperative dose of meloxicam were administered similarly to all cats. Behavioral and physiologic variables were recorded, and signs of pain were assessed by use of 2 pain assessment scales and von Frey filament testing in each cat prior to premedication administration (baseline), during recovery from anesthesia (RFA), and at 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, and 72 hours.

Results—Heart rate increased and temperature (determined via microchip transponder thermometry) decreased from baseline values during RFA in both groups. Compared with baseline values, pain scores were increased during RFA and at the 12- and 24-hour time points in both groups; von Frey scores were higher during RFA. Behavioral and physiologic variables did not differ significantly between groups at any time point.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In cats undergoing ovariohysterectomy, SC administration of a preoperative dose of SR buprenorphine appeared to have comparable efficacy and adverse effect profile as that of twice-daily OTM administration of buprenorphine before and after surgery.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Mama (khursheed.mama@colostate.edu).

Dr. Catbagan's present address is Cherrydale Veterinary Clinic, 4038 Lee Hwy, Arlington, VA 22207. Dr. Rychel's present address is Fort Collins Veterinary Emergency Hospital and Rehabilitation Center, 816 S Lemay Ave, Fort Collins, CO 80524. Dr. Mich's present address is Ortho Pets Center for Animal Pain Management and Mobility Solutions, 886 E 78th Ave, Denver, CO 80229.

Dr. Catbagan's present address is Cherrydale Veterinary Clinic, 4038 Lee Hwy, Arlington, VA 22207. Dr. Rychel's present address is Fort Collins Veterinary Emergency Hospital and Rehabilitation Center, 816 S Lemay Ave, Fort Collins, CO 80524. Dr. Mich's present address is Ortho Pets Center for Animal Pain Management and Mobility Solutions, 886 E 78th Ave, Denver, CO 80229.

Supported by Wildlife Pharmaceuticals.

The authors thank Pamela Vogel and Chelsea Sonius for technical support, Jim ZumBrunnen for statistical analysis, Dr. Peter Hellyer for provision of the pain and comfort assessment scale, and Dr. Michael Lappin for provision of the cats used in the study.