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Plasma disposition, concentration in the hair, and anthelmintic efficacy of eprinomectin after topical administration in donkeys

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  • 1 Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Adnan Menderes, Isikli Koyu 09100 Aydin, Turkey.
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Naples Federico II, 80138 Naples, Italy.
  • | 3 ADUBILTEM Research and Development Centre, University of Adnan Menderes, Isikli Koyu 09100 Aydin, Turkey.
  • | 4 Equine Practices, Clinica Nuovi Orizzonti, Via Siracusa, Castelvolturno, 81030 Caserta, Italy.
  • | 5 Department of Pathology and Animal Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Naples Federico II, 80138 Naples, Italy.

Abstract

Objective—To investigate plasma disposition, concentration in the hair, and anthelmintic efficacy of eprinomectin after topical administration in donkeys.

Animals—12 donkeys naturally infected with strongyle nematodes.

Procedures—The pour-on formulation of eprinomectin approved for use in cattle was administered topically to donkeys at a dosage of 0.5 mg/kg. Heparinized blood samples and hair samples were collected at various times between 1 hour and 40 days after administration. Samples were analyzed via high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. Fecal strongyle egg counts were performed by use of a modified McMaster technique before and at weekly intervals for 8 weeks after treatment.

Results—Plasma concentration and systemic availability of eprinomectin were relatively higher in donkeys, compared with values reported for other animal species. Concerning the anthelmintic efficacy against strongyle nematodes, eprinomectin was completely effective (100%) on days 7 and 14 and highly effective (> 99%) until the end of the study at 56 days after treatment. No abnormal clinical signs or adverse reactions were observed for any donkeys after treatment.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Eprinomectin had excellent safety. The relatively high plasma concentration after topical administration could result in use of eprinomectin for the control and treatment of parasitic diseases in donkeys.

Abstract

Objective—To investigate plasma disposition, concentration in the hair, and anthelmintic efficacy of eprinomectin after topical administration in donkeys.

Animals—12 donkeys naturally infected with strongyle nematodes.

Procedures—The pour-on formulation of eprinomectin approved for use in cattle was administered topically to donkeys at a dosage of 0.5 mg/kg. Heparinized blood samples and hair samples were collected at various times between 1 hour and 40 days after administration. Samples were analyzed via high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. Fecal strongyle egg counts were performed by use of a modified McMaster technique before and at weekly intervals for 8 weeks after treatment.

Results—Plasma concentration and systemic availability of eprinomectin were relatively higher in donkeys, compared with values reported for other animal species. Concerning the anthelmintic efficacy against strongyle nematodes, eprinomectin was completely effective (100%) on days 7 and 14 and highly effective (> 99%) until the end of the study at 56 days after treatment. No abnormal clinical signs or adverse reactions were observed for any donkeys after treatment.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Eprinomectin had excellent safety. The relatively high plasma concentration after topical administration could result in use of eprinomectin for the control and treatment of parasitic diseases in donkeys.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Gokbulut (cengizgokbulut@yahoo.com).