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Evaluation of an acute focal epidural mass model to characterize the intracranial pressure-volume relationship in healthy Beagles

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  • 1 Departments of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47906.
  • | 2 Basic Medical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47906.
  • | 3 Departments of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47906.
  • | 4 Departments of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47906.
  • | 5 Departments of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47906.

Abstract

Objective—To characterize the intracranial pressure-volume relationship (ICPVR) in dogs by use of an acute frontal-parietal mass lesion model.

Animals—7 healthy adult female Beagles.

Procedures—Dogs were anesthetized with isoflurane to achieve a surgical plane of anesthesia. A fiberoptic intracranial pressure (ICP) monitor was inserted to a depth of 1 cm in the parenchyma of the right frontal-parietal region of the brain. A Foley balloon-tipped catheter was placed in the epidural space of the left frontal-parietal area through a separate 1-cm burr hole. Baseline measurements were obtained with the balloon deflated. The balloon was then inflated incrementally with 0.5 mL of 0.9% NaCl solution every 10 minutes until ICP exceeded mean arterial blood pressure. Nonlinear regression analysis with 2-factor and 3-factor exponential equations was used to characterize the ICPVR.

Results—The mean baseline ICP was 11 mm Hg, with a 95% confidence interval of 2 to 20 mm Hg. The ICPVR was well characterized by 2-factor or 3-factor exponential equations for all dogs (R2 > 0.93). Balloon volumes of > 1. 2 mL were associated with ICP > 20 mm Hg.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Characterization of the ICPVR may provide clinically useful information regarding the safety of obtaining CSF from the atlanto-occipital space or implantation of brachytherapy catheters and for determining the need for decompressive craniectomy in dogs with acute intracranial disease. High ICP should be suspected in dogs that have an acute frontal-parietal mass lesion estimated to exceed 2% of the brain volume.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Simmons's present address is Advanced Veterinary Care, 1021 E 3300 St, Salt Lake City, UT 84106.

Dr. Davis's present address is Canada West Veterinary Specialists and Critical Care Hospital, 1988 Kootenay St, Vancouver, BC V5M 4Y3, Canada.

Supported in part by NeuroLife Noninvasive Solutions Incorporated.

The authors thank Drs. Amy E. Fauber, Joseph M. Mankin, and Melissa Logan for their assistance in data collection.

Address correspondence to Dr. Packer (rpacker@purdue.edu).