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Renal and cardiorespiratory effects of treatment with lactated Ringer's solution or physiologic saline (0.9% NaCl) solution in cats with experimentally induced urethral obstruction

Marina G. M. C. M. CunhaDepartamento de Clínica de Pequenos Animais, Centro de Ciencias Rurais, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS 97105–900, Brazil.

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Gabrielle C. FreitasDepartamento de Clínica de Pequenos Animais, Centro de Ciencias Rurais, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS 97105–900, Brazil.

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Adriano B. CarregaroDepartamento de Clínica de Pequenos Animais, Centro de Ciencias Rurais, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS 97105–900, Brazil.

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Kleber GomesDepartamento de Clínica de Pequenos Animais, Centro de Ciencias Rurais, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS 97105–900, Brazil.

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Joäo P M. C. M. CunhaDepartamento de Clínica de Pequenos Animais, Centro de Ciencias Rurais, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS 97105–900, Brazil.

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Diego V. BeckmannDepartamento de Clínica de Pequenos Animais, Centro de Ciencias Rurais, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS 97105–900, Brazil.

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Ney L. PippiDepartamento de Clínica de Pequenos Animais, Centro de Ciencias Rurais, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS 97105–900, Brazil.

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Abstract

Objective—To compare the renal and cardiorespiratory effects of IV treatment with lactated Ringer's solution (LRS) or physiologic saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (PSS) in severely decompensated cats with urethral obstruction (UO).

Animals—14 cats (4 cats were used only to establish infusion rates).

Procedures—An occluded urethral catheter was used to induce UO in each cat. After development of severe metabolic acidosis, hyperkalemia, and postrenal azotemia, the obstruction was relieved (0 hours); LRS or PSS (5 cats/group) was administered IV (gradually decreasing rate) beginning 15 minutes before and continuing for 48 hours after UO relief. Ten minutes before urethral catheter placement (baseline), at start of fluid therapy (SFT), and at intervals during fluid administration, various physical and clinicopathologic evaluations were performed.

Results—Metabolic acidosis was detected in the PSS-treated group at SFT and 2 hours after relief of UO and in the LRS-treated group only at SFT The PSS-treated group had significantly lower blood pH and bicarbonate concentrations at 8 through 48 hours and lower base excess values at 2 through 48 hours, compared with the LRS-treated group. Hypocalcemia and hypernatremia were detected in the PSS-treated group at 2 and 12 hours, respectively. Absolute serum potassium and chloride concentrations did not differ significantly between groups at any time point.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Treatment with LRS or PSS appeared to be safe and effective in cats with experimentally induced UO; however, LRS was more efficient in restoring the acid-base and electrolyte balance in severely decompensated cats with UO.

Abstract

Objective—To compare the renal and cardiorespiratory effects of IV treatment with lactated Ringer's solution (LRS) or physiologic saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (PSS) in severely decompensated cats with urethral obstruction (UO).

Animals—14 cats (4 cats were used only to establish infusion rates).

Procedures—An occluded urethral catheter was used to induce UO in each cat. After development of severe metabolic acidosis, hyperkalemia, and postrenal azotemia, the obstruction was relieved (0 hours); LRS or PSS (5 cats/group) was administered IV (gradually decreasing rate) beginning 15 minutes before and continuing for 48 hours after UO relief. Ten minutes before urethral catheter placement (baseline), at start of fluid therapy (SFT), and at intervals during fluid administration, various physical and clinicopathologic evaluations were performed.

Results—Metabolic acidosis was detected in the PSS-treated group at SFT and 2 hours after relief of UO and in the LRS-treated group only at SFT The PSS-treated group had significantly lower blood pH and bicarbonate concentrations at 8 through 48 hours and lower base excess values at 2 through 48 hours, compared with the LRS-treated group. Hypocalcemia and hypernatremia were detected in the PSS-treated group at 2 and 12 hours, respectively. Absolute serum potassium and chloride concentrations did not differ significantly between groups at any time point.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Treatment with LRS or PSS appeared to be safe and effective in cats with experimentally induced UO; however, LRS was more efficient in restoring the acid-base and electrolyte balance in severely decompensated cats with UO.

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Maria Cunha (morimv@yahoo.com.br).