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Evaluation of 30- and 25-diopter intraocular lens implants in equine eyes after surgical extraction of the lens

Richard J. McMullenDepartments of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606.

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Michael G. DavidsonDepartments of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606.

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Nigel B. CampbellMolecular Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606.

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Jacklyn H. SalmonDepartments of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606.

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Brian C. GilgerDepartments of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606.

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Abstract

Objective—To determine appropriate intraocular lens (IOL) implant strength to approximate emmetropia in horses.

Sample Population—16 enucleated globes and 4 adult horses.

Procedures—Lens diameter of 10 enucleated globes was measured. Results were used to determine the appropriate-sized IOL implant for insertion in 6 enucleated globes and 4 eyes of adult horses. Streak retinoscopy and ocular ultrasonography were performed before and after insertion of 30-diopter (D) IOL implants (enucleated globes) and insertion of 25-D IOL implants (adult horses).

Results—In enucleated globes, mean ± SD lens diameter was 20.14 ± 0.75 mm. Preoperative and postoperative refractive state of enucleated globes with 30-D IOL implants was −0.46 ± 1.03 D and −2.47 ± 1.03 D, respectively; preoperative and postoperative difference in refraction was 2.96 ± 0.84 D. Preoperative anterior chamber (AC) depth, crystalline lens thickness (CLT), and axial globe length (AxL) were 712 ± 0.82 mm, 11.32 ± 0.81 mm, and 40.52 ± 1.26 mm, respectively; postoperative AC depth was 10.76 ± 1.16 mm. Mean ratio of preoperative to postoperative AC depth was 0.68. In eyes receiving 25-D IOL implants, preoperative and postoperative mean refractive error was 0.08 ± 0.68 D and −3.94 ± 1.88 D, respectively. Preoperative AC depth, CLT, and AxL were 6.36 ± 0.22 mm, 10.92 ± 1.92 mm, and 38.64 ± 2.59 mm, respectively. Postoperative AC depth was 8.99 ± 1.68 mm. Mean ratio of preoperative to postoperative AC depth was 0.73.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Insertion of 30-D (enucleated globes) and 25-D IOL implants (adult horses) resulted in overcorrection of refractive error.

Abstract

Objective—To determine appropriate intraocular lens (IOL) implant strength to approximate emmetropia in horses.

Sample Population—16 enucleated globes and 4 adult horses.

Procedures—Lens diameter of 10 enucleated globes was measured. Results were used to determine the appropriate-sized IOL implant for insertion in 6 enucleated globes and 4 eyes of adult horses. Streak retinoscopy and ocular ultrasonography were performed before and after insertion of 30-diopter (D) IOL implants (enucleated globes) and insertion of 25-D IOL implants (adult horses).

Results—In enucleated globes, mean ± SD lens diameter was 20.14 ± 0.75 mm. Preoperative and postoperative refractive state of enucleated globes with 30-D IOL implants was −0.46 ± 1.03 D and −2.47 ± 1.03 D, respectively; preoperative and postoperative difference in refraction was 2.96 ± 0.84 D. Preoperative anterior chamber (AC) depth, crystalline lens thickness (CLT), and axial globe length (AxL) were 712 ± 0.82 mm, 11.32 ± 0.81 mm, and 40.52 ± 1.26 mm, respectively; postoperative AC depth was 10.76 ± 1.16 mm. Mean ratio of preoperative to postoperative AC depth was 0.68. In eyes receiving 25-D IOL implants, preoperative and postoperative mean refractive error was 0.08 ± 0.68 D and −3.94 ± 1.88 D, respectively. Preoperative AC depth, CLT, and AxL were 6.36 ± 0.22 mm, 10.92 ± 1.92 mm, and 38.64 ± 2.59 mm, respectively. Postoperative AC depth was 8.99 ± 1.68 mm. Mean ratio of preoperative to postoperative AC depth was 0.73.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Insertion of 30-D (enucleated globes) and 25-D IOL implants (adult horses) resulted in overcorrection of refractive error.

Contributor Notes

Supported by an American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists Vision for Animals Foundation Grant, the North Carolina State University Equine Uveitis Research Fund, and Acrivet Incorporated.

Presented in abstract form at the 39th Annual Meeting of the American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists, Boston, October 2008.

Address correspondence to Dr. Gilger (brian_gilger@ncsu.edu).