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Evaluation of orally administered robenacoxib versus ketoprofen for treatment of acute pain and inflammation associated with musculoskeletal disorders in cats

Jerome M. GiraudelNovartis Centre de Recherche Santé Animale SA, CH-1566 StAubin FR, Switzerland

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Philippe GruetNovartis Animal Health Inc, 14 Blvd Richelieu, F-92845 Rueil-Malmaison, France

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Debbie G. AlexanderNovartis Animal Health Inc, New Cambridge House, Litlington, Hertfordshire, SG8 0SS, England

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Wolfgang SeewaldNovartis Animal Health Inc, Schwarzwaldallee 215, CH-4058 Basel, Switzerland

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Jonathan N. KingNovartis Animal Health Inc, Schwarzwaldallee 215, CH-4058 Basel, Switzerland

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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of oral administration of robenacoxib for treatment of acute pain and inflammation associated with musculoskeletal disorders in cats.

Animals—155 cats requiring relief of signs of pain and inflammation associated with acute musculoskeletal disorders.

Procedures—The study was a multicenter, prospective, randomized, masked, noninferiority field trial. Cats were allocated randomly to 1 of 3 treatment groups: group 1 (1.0 to 2.4 mg of robenacoxib/kg, q 24 h), group 2 (1.0 to 2.4 mg of robenacoxib/kg, q 12 h [daily dosage, 2.0 to 4.8 mg/kg]), and group 3 (ketoprofen [mean dosage, 1 mg/kg, q 24 h]). All cats were administered tablets PO for 5 or 6 days. The primary efficacy endpoint was the investigator global assessment score, which was the sum of scores of signs of pain, inflammation, and mobility assessed in a masked manner by veterinary investigators at baseline, day 2, and day 4 or 5. Cat owners monitored in a nonmasked manner secondary responses by observation of cats’ activity, behavior, appetite, and interactions. Safety was assessed by monitoring adverse events, clinical signs, and hematologic and plasma biochemical variables (before and after treatment).

Results—No significant differences were detected among the 3 treatment groups for any primary or secondary efficacy endpoints or for tolerability variables. Robenacoxib tablets administered once daily were significantly more palatable than ketoprofen tablets.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Robenacoxib tablets administered once daily had noninferior efficacy and tolerability, and superior palatability, compared with the active control drug, ketoprofen, for the treatment of signs of acute pain and inflammation associated with musculoskeletal disorders in cats.

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of oral administration of robenacoxib for treatment of acute pain and inflammation associated with musculoskeletal disorders in cats.

Animals—155 cats requiring relief of signs of pain and inflammation associated with acute musculoskeletal disorders.

Procedures—The study was a multicenter, prospective, randomized, masked, noninferiority field trial. Cats were allocated randomly to 1 of 3 treatment groups: group 1 (1.0 to 2.4 mg of robenacoxib/kg, q 24 h), group 2 (1.0 to 2.4 mg of robenacoxib/kg, q 12 h [daily dosage, 2.0 to 4.8 mg/kg]), and group 3 (ketoprofen [mean dosage, 1 mg/kg, q 24 h]). All cats were administered tablets PO for 5 or 6 days. The primary efficacy endpoint was the investigator global assessment score, which was the sum of scores of signs of pain, inflammation, and mobility assessed in a masked manner by veterinary investigators at baseline, day 2, and day 4 or 5. Cat owners monitored in a nonmasked manner secondary responses by observation of cats’ activity, behavior, appetite, and interactions. Safety was assessed by monitoring adverse events, clinical signs, and hematologic and plasma biochemical variables (before and after treatment).

Results—No significant differences were detected among the 3 treatment groups for any primary or secondary efficacy endpoints or for tolerability variables. Robenacoxib tablets administered once daily were significantly more palatable than ketoprofen tablets.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Robenacoxib tablets administered once daily had noninferior efficacy and tolerability, and superior palatability, compared with the active control drug, ketoprofen, for the treatment of signs of acute pain and inflammation associated with musculoskeletal disorders in cats.

Contributor Notes

Dr. Alexander's present address is 96 St. Matthews Gardens, Cambridge, CB1 2PT, England.

Address correspondence to Dr. King (jonathan.king@novartis.com).