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Effects of renal autograft ischemic storage and reperfusion on intraoperative hemodynamic patterns and plasma renin concentrations in clinically normal cats undergoing renal autotransplantation and contralateral nephrectomy

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  • 1 Departments of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.
  • | 2 Departments of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.
  • | 3 Large Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.
  • | 4 Department of Surgical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 57305.
  • | 5 Population Health, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.
  • | 6 Large Animal Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effect of the duration of cold Ischemia on the renin-angiotensin system during renal transplantation In cats and to define the potential Influence of vasoactive factors in renal tissue following cold ischemic storage versus warm ischemic storage

Animals—10 purpose-bred 6-month-old sexually Intact female cats

Procedures—10 cats underwent renal autotransplantation after 30 minutes (n = 5) or 3 hours (5) of simple, ex vivo cold storage of renal autographs. Following autograft reperfusion, direct hemodynamic variables were measured with a telemetric Implant and samples were collected for plasma renin concentration. Activation of vascular-related genes (renin, endothelin, and angiotensin converting enzyme) relative to 2-hour simple cold or warm ischemia was also evaluated.

Results—No significant difference between groups was detected In any of the hemodynamic variables or postreperfusion plasma renin concentrations measured in this study relative to the duration of cold ischemic storage. There was also no difference between warm- and cold-stored kidneys in the expression of vascular-related genes

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Prolonged renal Ischemia for clinically relevant durations does not appear to predispose clinically normal cats to altered hemodynamics or high plasma renin concentrations following graft reperfusion. Activation of vasoactive genes does not appear to be Influenced by type of Ischemia over 2 hours. (Am J Vet Res 2010;71:1220-1227)

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effect of the duration of cold Ischemia on the renin-angiotensin system during renal transplantation In cats and to define the potential Influence of vasoactive factors in renal tissue following cold ischemic storage versus warm ischemic storage

Animals—10 purpose-bred 6-month-old sexually Intact female cats

Procedures—10 cats underwent renal autotransplantation after 30 minutes (n = 5) or 3 hours (5) of simple, ex vivo cold storage of renal autographs. Following autograft reperfusion, direct hemodynamic variables were measured with a telemetric Implant and samples were collected for plasma renin concentration. Activation of vascular-related genes (renin, endothelin, and angiotensin converting enzyme) relative to 2-hour simple cold or warm ischemia was also evaluated.

Results—No significant difference between groups was detected In any of the hemodynamic variables or postreperfusion plasma renin concentrations measured in this study relative to the duration of cold ischemic storage. There was also no difference between warm- and cold-stored kidneys in the expression of vascular-related genes

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Prolonged renal Ischemia for clinically relevant durations does not appear to predispose clinically normal cats to altered hemodynamics or high plasma renin concentrations following graft reperfusion. Activation of vasoactive genes does not appear to be Influenced by type of Ischemia over 2 hours. (Am J Vet Res 2010;71:1220-1227)

Contributor Notes

Dr. Mercurio's present address is Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Ohio State University Columbus, OH 43210.

Supported by the Veterinary Medical Experiment Station and the University of Georgia, College of Veterinary Medicine, Clinical Research Fund.

Presented as an oral presentation at the American College of Veterinary Medicine Symposium, San Diego, October 2008.

The authors thank Caroline Salter for her assistance with real-time quantitative PCR assays and AnaSpec for assistance with fluorimetric renin assays.

Address correspondence to Dr. Schmiedt (cws@uga.edu).