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Effects of administration of caffeine on metabolic variables in neonatal pigs with peripartum asphyxia

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  • 1 Department of Animal Production and Agriculture, Área de Investigación: Ecodesarrollo de la Producción Animal, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, Xochimilco, CP 04960, México DF.
  • | 2 Department of Animal Production and Agriculture, Área de Investigación: Ecodesarrollo de la Producción Animal, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, Xochimilco, CP 04960, México DF.
  • | 3 Department of Reproductive Biology, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, Iztapalapa, CP 09340, México DF, Mexico.
  • | 4 Department of Animal Medicine and Production, Swine, Faculty of Veterinary and Animal Production, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, CP 04510, México DF, Mexico.
  • | 5 Academic Unit of Agro-hydraulic Engineering, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, CP 72000, Puebla, México.
  • | 6 Department of Experimental Research and Animal Resources, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador-Zubirán, CP 14000, México DF, Mexico.
  • | 7 Division of Neo-natology, Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez, CP 06720, México DF, Mexico.

Abstract

Objective—To determine effects of 2 doses of caffeine on metabolic variables in neonata pigs with peripartum asphyxia

Animals—180 neonatal pigs

Procedures—Neonatal pigs were assigned to 2 groups (groups P and F) on the basis of results for a vitality scale (passed or failed, respectively). Within each group, there were 3 subgroups of 30 pigs each. Within each group, the 3 subgroups received a placebo that consisted of an empty gelatin capsule, a gelatin capsule that contained 20 mg of caffeine, and a gelatin capsule that contained 35 mg of caffeine, respectively; all capsules were administered orally (0 hours). Blood samples were collected immediately before and 24 hours after capsule administration.

Results—Pigs in groups P and F that received 20 or 35 mg of caffeine had significant increases in triglyceride concentrations. All pigs in groups P and F had a significant decrease in lactate concentrations, although the placebo-treated pigs in group F had larger decreases than did the group F pigs treated with 20 or 35 mg of caffeine. Glucose concentrations increased significantly in group F pigs treated with 20 or 35 mg of caffeine (30% and 50%, respectively), whereas glucose concentrations remained unchanged in group P pigs. In pigs treated with 35 mg of caffeine, the final weight obtained for group F was approximately 8% lower than that obtained for group P

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Administering caffeine immediately after birth to neonatal pigs with severe oxygen restriction resulted in significant improvements in metabolic variables. (Am J Vet Res 2010;71:1214-1219)

Abstract

Objective—To determine effects of 2 doses of caffeine on metabolic variables in neonata pigs with peripartum asphyxia

Animals—180 neonatal pigs

Procedures—Neonatal pigs were assigned to 2 groups (groups P and F) on the basis of results for a vitality scale (passed or failed, respectively). Within each group, there were 3 subgroups of 30 pigs each. Within each group, the 3 subgroups received a placebo that consisted of an empty gelatin capsule, a gelatin capsule that contained 20 mg of caffeine, and a gelatin capsule that contained 35 mg of caffeine, respectively; all capsules were administered orally (0 hours). Blood samples were collected immediately before and 24 hours after capsule administration.

Results—Pigs in groups P and F that received 20 or 35 mg of caffeine had significant increases in triglyceride concentrations. All pigs in groups P and F had a significant decrease in lactate concentrations, although the placebo-treated pigs in group F had larger decreases than did the group F pigs treated with 20 or 35 mg of caffeine. Glucose concentrations increased significantly in group F pigs treated with 20 or 35 mg of caffeine (30% and 50%, respectively), whereas glucose concentrations remained unchanged in group P pigs. In pigs treated with 35 mg of caffeine, the final weight obtained for group F was approximately 8% lower than that obtained for group P

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Administering caffeine immediately after birth to neonatal pigs with severe oxygen restriction resulted in significant improvements in metabolic variables. (Am J Vet Res 2010;71:1214-1219)

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Mota-Rojas (dmota40@yahoo.com.mx).

The authors thank Q. Antonio Campos Osorno for assistance with blood gas and electrolyte analyses.

Mr. Orozco-Gregorio is enrolled in the Doctoral Program in Biological Sciences and supported by Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología, Mexico (CONACYT; grant No. 165101). Support for Drs. Mota-Rojas, Bonilla-Jaime, and Trujillo-Ortega and Mr. Hernandez-Gonzalez was provided by Mexico's Sistema Nacional de Investigadores.