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Evaluation of a three-dimensional kinematic model for canine gait analysis

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  • 1 Department of Kinesiology, College of Health Sciences, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.
  • | 2 Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.
  • | 3 Department of Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate a 3-D kinematic model of the hind limb developed by use of a joint coordinate system in dogs.

Animals—6 clinically normal adult mixed-breed dogs.

Procedures—17 retroreflective markers were affixed to the skin on the right hind limb of each dog. Eight infrared cameras were arranged around a gait platform to record marker locations as dogs were recorded moving through the calibrated space 5 times during a walk and trot at velocities of 0.9 to 1.2 m/s and 1.7 to 2.1 m/s, respectively. Local and global coordinate systems were established, and a segmental rigid-body model of the canine hind limb was produced. Dynamic 3-D joint kinematic measurements were collected for the hip, stifle, and tarsal joints.

Results—Sagittal (flexion-extension), transverse (internal-external rotation), and frontal (abduction-adduction) plane kinematic measurements were acquired during each trial for the hip, stifle, and tarsal joints.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The joint coordinate system allowed acquisition of 3-D kinematic measurements of the hip, stifle, and tarsal joints of the canine hind limb. Methods were described to model 3-D joint motion of the canine hind limb. (Am J Vet Res 2010;71:1118-1122)

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate a 3-D kinematic model of the hind limb developed by use of a joint coordinate system in dogs.

Animals—6 clinically normal adult mixed-breed dogs.

Procedures—17 retroreflective markers were affixed to the skin on the right hind limb of each dog. Eight infrared cameras were arranged around a gait platform to record marker locations as dogs were recorded moving through the calibrated space 5 times during a walk and trot at velocities of 0.9 to 1.2 m/s and 1.7 to 2.1 m/s, respectively. Local and global coordinate systems were established, and a segmental rigid-body model of the canine hind limb was produced. Dynamic 3-D joint kinematic measurements were collected for the hip, stifle, and tarsal joints.

Results—Sagittal (flexion-extension), transverse (internal-external rotation), and frontal (abduction-adduction) plane kinematic measurements were acquired during each trial for the hip, stifle, and tarsal joints.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The joint coordinate system allowed acquisition of 3-D kinematic measurements of the hip, stifle, and tarsal joints of the canine hind limb. Methods were described to model 3-D joint motion of the canine hind limb. (Am J Vet Res 2010;71:1118-1122)

Contributor Notes

Address correspondence to Dr. Budsberg (bbudsberg@uga.edu).