Comparison of tepoxalin, carprofen, and meloxicam for reducing intraocular inflammation in dogs

Margi A. Gilmour Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078.

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Terry W. Lehenbauer Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078.

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Abstract

Objective—To compare effects of orally administered tepoxalin, carprofen, and meloxicam for controlling aqueocentesis-induced anterior uveitis in dogs, as determined by measurement of aqueous prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) concentrations.

Animals—38 mixed-breed dogs.

Procedures—Dogs were allotted to a control group and 3 treatment groups. Dogs in the control group received no medication. Dogs in each of the treatment groups received an NSAID (tepoxalin, 10 mg/kg, PO, q 24 h; carprofen, 2.2 mg/kg, PO, q 12 h; or meloxicam, 0.2 mg/kg, PO, q 24 h) on days 0 and 1. On day 1, dogs were anesthetized and an initial aqueocentesis was performed on both eyes; 1 hour later, a second aqueocentesis was performed. Aqueous samples were frozen at −80°C until assayed for PGE2 concentrations via an enzyme immunoassay kit.

Results—Significant differences between aqueous PGE2 concentrations in the first and second samples from the control group indicated that aqueocentesis induced uveitis. Median change in PGE2 concentrations for the tepoxalin group (10 dogs [16 eyes]) was significantly lower than the median change for the control group (8 dogs [16 eyes]), carprofen group (9 dogs [16 eyes]), or meloxicam group (9 dogs [16 eyes]). Median changes in PGE2 concentrations for dogs treated with meloxicam or carprofen were lower but not significantly different from changes for control dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Tepoxalin was more effective than carprofen or meloxicam for controlling the production of PGE2 in dogs with experimentally induced uveitis. Tepoxalin may be an appropriate choice when treating dogs with anterior uveitis.

Abstract

Objective—To compare effects of orally administered tepoxalin, carprofen, and meloxicam for controlling aqueocentesis-induced anterior uveitis in dogs, as determined by measurement of aqueous prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) concentrations.

Animals—38 mixed-breed dogs.

Procedures—Dogs were allotted to a control group and 3 treatment groups. Dogs in the control group received no medication. Dogs in each of the treatment groups received an NSAID (tepoxalin, 10 mg/kg, PO, q 24 h; carprofen, 2.2 mg/kg, PO, q 12 h; or meloxicam, 0.2 mg/kg, PO, q 24 h) on days 0 and 1. On day 1, dogs were anesthetized and an initial aqueocentesis was performed on both eyes; 1 hour later, a second aqueocentesis was performed. Aqueous samples were frozen at −80°C until assayed for PGE2 concentrations via an enzyme immunoassay kit.

Results—Significant differences between aqueous PGE2 concentrations in the first and second samples from the control group indicated that aqueocentesis induced uveitis. Median change in PGE2 concentrations for the tepoxalin group (10 dogs [16 eyes]) was significantly lower than the median change for the control group (8 dogs [16 eyes]), carprofen group (9 dogs [16 eyes]), or meloxicam group (9 dogs [16 eyes]). Median changes in PGE2 concentrations for dogs treated with meloxicam or carprofen were lower but not significantly different from changes for control dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Tepoxalin was more effective than carprofen or meloxicam for controlling the production of PGE2 in dogs with experimentally induced uveitis. Tepoxalin may be an appropriate choice when treating dogs with anterior uveitis.

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