Effect of gastric ulceration on physiologic responses to exercise in horses

Jorge E. Nieto Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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Jack R. Snyder Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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Nicholas J. Vatistas Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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James H. Jones Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

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 PhD, DVM

Abstract

Objective—To develop a protocol to induce and maintain gastric ulceration in horses and to determine whether gastric ulceration affects physiologic indices of performance during high-speed treadmill exercise.

Animals—20 healthy Thoroughbreds.

Procedures—Each horse was acclimatized to treadmill exercise during a 2-week period. Subsequently, baseline data were collected (day 0) and each horse began an incrementally increasing exercise training program (days 1 through 56). Beginning on day 14, horses were administered omeprazole (4 mg/kg, PO, q 24 h until day 56) or no drug (10 horses/group) and underwent alternating 24-hour periods of feeding and feed withholding for 10 days to induce gastric ulceration. Extent of gastric ulceration was assessed weekly thereafter via gastroscopy. Physiologic indices of performance were measured at days 0 and 56. Gastric ulceration and exercise performance indices were compared within and between groups.

Results—In untreated horses, gastric ulcers were induced and maintained through day 56. Gastric ulcer formation was prevented in omeprazole-treated horses. There were significant interactions between time (pre- and post-training data) and treatment (nonulcer and ulcer groups) for mass-specific maximal O2 consumption (O2max/Mb) and mass-specific maximal CO2 production (CO2max/Mb). Post hoc analysis revealed a difference between groups for O2max/Mb at day 56. Within-group differences for O2max/Mb and CO2max/Mb were detected for omeprazole-treated horses, but not for the horses with ulcers.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In horses, gastric ulcers were induced and maintained by use of alternating periods of feeding and feed withholding in association with treadmill exercise (simulated racetrack training). Gastric ulcers adversely affected physiologic indices of performance in horses.

Abstract

Objective—To develop a protocol to induce and maintain gastric ulceration in horses and to determine whether gastric ulceration affects physiologic indices of performance during high-speed treadmill exercise.

Animals—20 healthy Thoroughbreds.

Procedures—Each horse was acclimatized to treadmill exercise during a 2-week period. Subsequently, baseline data were collected (day 0) and each horse began an incrementally increasing exercise training program (days 1 through 56). Beginning on day 14, horses were administered omeprazole (4 mg/kg, PO, q 24 h until day 56) or no drug (10 horses/group) and underwent alternating 24-hour periods of feeding and feed withholding for 10 days to induce gastric ulceration. Extent of gastric ulceration was assessed weekly thereafter via gastroscopy. Physiologic indices of performance were measured at days 0 and 56. Gastric ulceration and exercise performance indices were compared within and between groups.

Results—In untreated horses, gastric ulcers were induced and maintained through day 56. Gastric ulcer formation was prevented in omeprazole-treated horses. There were significant interactions between time (pre- and post-training data) and treatment (nonulcer and ulcer groups) for mass-specific maximal O2 consumption (O2max/Mb) and mass-specific maximal CO2 production (CO2max/Mb). Post hoc analysis revealed a difference between groups for O2max/Mb at day 56. Within-group differences for O2max/Mb and CO2max/Mb were detected for omeprazole-treated horses, but not for the horses with ulcers.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In horses, gastric ulcers were induced and maintained by use of alternating periods of feeding and feed withholding in association with treadmill exercise (simulated racetrack training). Gastric ulcers adversely affected physiologic indices of performance in horses.

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