Evaluation of Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG for the prevention of atopic dermatitis in dogs

Rosanna Marsella Blanche Saunders Dermatology Laboratory, Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610.

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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the efficacy of the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG for the alleviation or prevention of clinical signs of atopic dermatitis (AD) in genetically predisposed dogs.

Animals—2 adult Beagles with severe AD and 16 puppies.

Procedures—The 2 adult Beagles were bred twice, with a year between breedings. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG was administered to the bitch during the second pregnancy and to the puppies of the second litter from 3 weeks to 6 months of age. Both litters were epicutaneously sensitized to Dermatophagoides farinae. Blood samples were collected from puppies every 6 weeks to measure serum titers of allergen-specific IgE. At 6 months of age, all puppies underwent intradermal allergen testing and environmental challenge with D farinae. Clinical signs were scored.

Results—In the first litter, at 6 months of age, 7 of 7 puppies were strongly seropositive for IgE against D farinae, 6 had a positive reaction to intradermal testing, and 7 developed severe clinical signs of AD after the environmental challenge. In the second litter, 7 of 9 puppies were seropositive, 3 had a positive reaction to intradermal testing, and 6 developed dermatitis and pruritus after the challenge. The second litter had a significantly lower serum titer of allergen-specific IgE and milder reaction to intradermal testing, compared with the first litter. Clinical scores did not differ between litters.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Administration of L rhamnosus GG to puppies appeared to reduce immunologic indicators of AD, although no significant decrease in clinical signs was detected.

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the efficacy of the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG for the alleviation or prevention of clinical signs of atopic dermatitis (AD) in genetically predisposed dogs.

Animals—2 adult Beagles with severe AD and 16 puppies.

Procedures—The 2 adult Beagles were bred twice, with a year between breedings. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG was administered to the bitch during the second pregnancy and to the puppies of the second litter from 3 weeks to 6 months of age. Both litters were epicutaneously sensitized to Dermatophagoides farinae. Blood samples were collected from puppies every 6 weeks to measure serum titers of allergen-specific IgE. At 6 months of age, all puppies underwent intradermal allergen testing and environmental challenge with D farinae. Clinical signs were scored.

Results—In the first litter, at 6 months of age, 7 of 7 puppies were strongly seropositive for IgE against D farinae, 6 had a positive reaction to intradermal testing, and 7 developed severe clinical signs of AD after the environmental challenge. In the second litter, 7 of 9 puppies were seropositive, 3 had a positive reaction to intradermal testing, and 6 developed dermatitis and pruritus after the challenge. The second litter had a significantly lower serum titer of allergen-specific IgE and milder reaction to intradermal testing, compared with the first litter. Clinical scores did not differ between litters.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Administration of L rhamnosus GG to puppies appeared to reduce immunologic indicators of AD, although no significant decrease in clinical signs was detected.

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