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Estimation of glomerular filtration rate in dogs by plasma clearance of gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid as measured by use of an ELISA

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  • 1 Department of Clinical Sciences, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536.
  • | 2 Department of Clinical Sciences, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts University, North Grafton, MA 01536.
  • | 3 BioPhysics Assay Laboratory Inc, 80 Webster St, Worcester, MA 01603.
  • | 4 BioPhysics Assay Laboratory Inc, 80 Webster St, Worcester, MA 01603.
  • | 5 BioPhysics Assay Laboratory Inc, 80 Webster St, Worcester, MA 01603.

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate use of gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) to estimate glomerular filtration rate (GFR) by plasma clearance and use of an ELISA as the method of Gd-DTPA quantification.

Animals—16 dogs of various sexes and breeds (12 dogs were clinically normal, and 4 dogs were polyuric and polydipsic with no other clinical or biochemical abnormalities).

Procedures—GFR was estimated by measuring the plasma clearance of Gd-DTPA and iohexol by use of an ELISA and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), respectively. The GFR was determined by use of a 1-compartment model for both methods. The GFRs obtained by Gd-DTPA plasma clearance were compared with those obtained by iohexol plasma clearance by use of correlation analysis, paired t tests, and limits of agreement analysis. A paired t test was used to evaluate differences between the 2 plasma clearance methods.

Results—A strong linear correlation (r2 = 0.90) was found between GFRs derived from the plasma clearance of Gd-DTPA and those derived from the plasma clearance of iohexol. By use of limits of agreement analysis, almost all (13/14) dogs had Gd-DTPA GFRs that were within 12% of iohexol GFRs. The remaining dog had a Gd-DTPA GFR that was 45% higher than the iohexol GFR. There was no significant difference between Gd-DTPA GFRs and those obtained with iohexol.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—This study revealed that plasma clearance of Gd-DTPA measured by use of an ELISA is an effective method to estimate GFR in dogs because it compared favorably with results for the iohexol-HPLC method.

Contributor Notes

Supported by Biophysics Assay Laboratory Incorporated.

Address correspondence to Dr. Ross.