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Indices of urine N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase activities in clinically normal adult dogs

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  • 1 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078.
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078.
  • | 3 Department of Statistics, College of Arts and Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078.

Abstract

Objective—To establish reference ranges for indices of urine N-acetyl-B-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) and G-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) activities in clinically normal adult dogs.

Animals—38 dogs.

Procedures—Each dog underwent a physical examination, CBC, serum biochemical analysis, urinalysis, and serologic testing for heartworm antigen and antibodies against Ehrlichia canis and Borrelia burgdorferi. Activities of NAG and GGT in urine were evaluated, and values of the respective indices were determined as urine NAG or GGT activity (U/L) divided by urine creatinine concentration (g/L).

Results—All dogs were considered clinically normal. A 90% prediction interval based on the 5th and 95th percentiles for GGT and NAG index values from both sexes was used to establish the reference ranges for dogs: 1.93 to 28.57 U/g and 0.02 to 3.63 U/g, respectively. Between males and females, urine NAG index differed significantly, whereas urine GGT index did not. When accounting for sex differences, reference ranges for the urine NAG index in males and females were 0.02 to 3.65 U/g and 0.02 to 2.31 U/g, respectively. Changes in urine pH significantly affected the urine GGT index but not the urine NAG index. Neither index changed significantly with changes in body surface area.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Data suggest that increases in urine NAG and GGT indices allow for earlier detection of renal tubular damage in dogs. Such early detection would enable adjustment of the clinical management of affected dogs to decrease morbidity and death rates associated with acute tubular injury and acute tubular necrosis.

Contributor Notes

The authors thank Dr. Jerry R. Malayer and the research advisory council, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, for funding.

Address correspondence to Dr. Brunker.