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Evaluation of urodynamic procedures in female cats anesthetized with low and high doses of isoflurane and propofol

Todd A. Cohen DVM1, Jodi L. Westropp DVM, PhD2, Philip H. Kass DVM, PhD3, and Bruno H. Pypendop DrMedVet, DrVetSci4
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  • 1 Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 2 Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 3 Department of Population Health and Reproduction, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.
  • | 4 Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.

Abstract

Objective—To compare effects of isoflurane and propofol on the cystometrogram and urethral pressure profile (UPP) in healthy female cats.

Animals—6 healthy female cats.

Procedures—Cats were anesthetized, and a consistent plane of anesthesia was maintained with low and high doses of isoflurane and propofol. A 6-F double-lumen urinary catheter was placed aseptically in the urethra for cystometrogram and UPP measurements. Threshold pressure and volume were recorded for cystometrograms. Maximum urethral pressure for smooth and skeletal muscle portions of the urethra, maximum urethral closure pressure, and functional profile length were measured during each UPP measurement. Heart rate and respiratory rate were recorded.

Results—Cats anesthetized with the low dose of propofol had consistent detrusor reflexes, compared with results for the other anesthetics. Mean ± SD threshold pressure, volume per unit of body weight, and compliance were 75.7 ± 16.3 cm H2O, 8.3 ± 3.2 mL/kg, and 0.5 ± 0.4 mL/cm H2O, respectively, for low-dose propofol. Anesthesia with either dose of propofol caused a significantly higher percentage change in heart rate during the cystometrogram, compared with results for anesthesia with isoflurane. Maximal urethral pressure in the area corresponding to skeletal muscle and the maximum urethral closure pressure were significantly higher for the low dose of propofol, compared with results for the high dose of propofol.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The low-dose propofol regimen was the easiest to titrate and maintain and yielded diagnostic-quality detrusor reflexes in all 6 cats. Anesthetic depth should be titrated appropriately when performing urodynamic procedures.

Contributor Notes

Supported in part by a grant from the Center for Companion Animal Health at the University of California, Davis, and the Gucci Ferracone Fund for Feline Urinary Disease Research.

Presented in abstract form at the 25th Annual American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine Forum, Seattle, June 2007.

The authors thank Kristine Siao for technical assistance.

Address correspondence to Dr. Westropp.