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Evaluation of the mydriatic effect of intracameral lidocaine hydrochloride injection in eyes of clinically normal dogs

Shin-Ae Park DVM, PhD1, Na-Ra Kim DVM2, Young-Woo Park DVM3, Man-Bok Jeong DVM, PhD4, Won-Tae Kim DVM5, Se-Eun Kim DVM6, Tae-Hyun Kim DVM7, and Kang-Moon Seo DVM, PhD8
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  • 1 Department of Veterinary Surgery and Ophthalmology, College of Veterinary Medicine, and BK21 Program for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University, San 56-1, Sillim 9-dong, Gwanakgu, Seoul 151-742, Republic of Korea.
  • | 2 Department of Veterinary Surgery and Ophthalmology, College of Veterinary Medicine, and BK21 Program for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University, San 56-1, Sillim 9-dong, Gwanakgu, Seoul 151-742, Republic of Korea.
  • | 3 Department of Veterinary Surgery and Ophthalmology, College of Veterinary Medicine, and BK21 Program for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University, San 56-1, Sillim 9-dong, Gwanakgu, Seoul 151-742, Republic of Korea.
  • | 4 Department of Veterinary Surgery and Ophthalmology, College of Veterinary Medicine, and BK21 Program for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University, San 56-1, Sillim 9-dong, Gwanakgu, Seoul 151-742, Republic of Korea.
  • | 5 Department of Veterinary Surgery and Ophthalmology, College of Veterinary Medicine, and BK21 Program for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University, San 56-1, Sillim 9-dong, Gwanakgu, Seoul 151-742, Republic of Korea.
  • | 6 Department of Veterinary Surgery and Ophthalmology, College of Veterinary Medicine, and BK21 Program for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University, San 56-1, Sillim 9-dong, Gwanakgu, Seoul 151-742, Republic of Korea.
  • | 7 Department of Veterinary Surgery and Ophthalmology, College of Veterinary Medicine, and BK21 Program for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University, San 56-1, Sillim 9-dong, Gwanakgu, Seoul 151-742, Republic of Korea.
  • | 8 Department of Veterinary Surgery and Ophthalmology, College of Veterinary Medicine, and BK21 Program for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University, San 56-1, Sillim 9-dong, Gwanakgu, Seoul 151-742, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the mydriatic effect of intracameral injection of preservative-free 1% and 2% lidocaine hydrochloride solutions and determine the onset and duration of mydriasis according to the concentration and volume of lidocaine administered in healthy dogs.

Animals—5 healthy adult Beagles weighing 7 to 10 kg, with no apparent ocular disease.

Procedures—A double-blind randomized 9-session crossover trial was designed. Both eyes were assigned to 9 treatments with a minimum 7-day washout period between treatments: 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 mL of 2% lidocaine solution; 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 mL of 1% lidocaine solution; and 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 mL of balanced salt solution. Dogs were anesthetized, and the allocated treatment was injected intracamerally after aspiration of the same volume of aqueous humor from the anterior chamber of each eye. Two perpendicular pupil diameters were measured. Intraocular pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, ECG readings, and end-tidal partial pressure of CO2 were monitored.

Results—Intracameral injection of 1% or 2% lidocaine solutions in volumes of 0.1 to 0.3 mL induced a significant degree of mydriasis, and the effect was maintained for 74 to 142 minutes. Lidocaine injection had no significant effect on intraocular pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, ECG readings, or end-tidal partial pressure of CO2.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Intracameral lidocaine injection in healthy dogs induced mydriasis, the timing of which was affected by concentration and volume of lidocaine. This technique could serve as an alternative to topically administered mydriatics for intraocular surgery in dogs.

Contributor Notes

Supported by the BK21 Program for Veterinary Science and the Research Institute for Veterinary Science, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University.

Address correspondence to Dr. Seo (kmseo@snu.ac.kr).